Bill and Tim’s Excellent Adventure

Or…

Geek 2.0 meets Geek 1.0

If you’ve been following the “Web 2.0” conversations, are interested in the future of web technology, or just have a half hour or so to kill, you should check out this video of Tim O’Reilly and Bill Gates. In the video from Mix 06 O’Reilly leads off by drawing a paralell between Web 2.0 and Microsoft’s Live Software, a parallel which I’m afraid Gates didn’t (or didn’t want to) understand.

Common Web 2.0 topics came up, like perpetual beta, user added value, RSS, etc. Not surprisingly Gates was clearly uncomfortable with the topics. For example, when O’Reilly brought up the topic of perpetual beta, Gates went to his comfort zone and talked about how Microsoft’s plan to upgrade IE as often as three times per year was cutting edge. Similarly when O’Reilly mentioned the mashup of craig’s list and Google Maps as part of the evolution of the web as a platform rather than continue on that topic, Gates shapes his response into a description of the products Microsoft is developing to compete with Google Maps.

Through the whole presentation it becomes increasingly clear that Gates is only comfortable speaking about his own company’s technology while O’Reilly is talking about the direction of the industry. This is why I say Geek 2.0 meets Geek 1.0. Geek 2.0 (O’Reilly) speaks in terms like standards, technologies, trends, platforms. Geek 1.0 (Gates) speaks in terms like program x, technology b, product t. Geek 1.0 thinks their software vendor should and will innovate within their field, while geek 2.0 reaches out to open-source products and custom mashups and software which will evolve with usage.

Watch the body language in this video. O’Reilly looks like he could be sitting in his living room talking to someone. Gates looks like he’s on trial. Pretty bad since the Mix conference was hosted by Microsoft.

Check out the video here.

Thanks to Ken for pointing this out last week.

microsoft, oreilly, o’reilly, web 2.0, web20, web office, software, software development

Blogs.Oracle.com

OracleOracle has taken an interesting step, and I hope others will follow.

Blogs.Oracle.com seems to have been created as an Oracle blogroll! Why is this important? Well, for one thing it means Oracle is encouraging their employees to blog, but additionally they are also linking to non-employee blogs.

Here’s the introduction from Blogs.Oracle.com:

Welcome to the Oracle blogging community, where Oracle executives, employees, and non-employees alike exchange views about best practices for using Oracle and industry-standard technologies. This continuous feedback loop helps Oracle stay in touch with the needs of the overall community, so keep those comments coming!

This not only validates what others have been saying regarding the value of blogging in the corporate environment, but also recognizes the role that non-employees play in the big picture.

Check it out at Blogs.Oracle.com. Right now there are a couple dozen employee blogs and fourty-something non-employee blogs. Hopefully they’ll stay on top of adding new folks as they come along.

blogging, information technology, internet, technology, web, web 2.0, web office, blog, database, database administration, database programming, dba, pl/sql, plsql, sql, oracle

Why blog?

Every once in a while I revisit the question of why I blog. Not because I doubt that I should, but because I see by blog as a living, evolving part of my personal and professional self.

Rod Boothby of Innovation Creators sums it up nicely in reference to MBA students:

With 10 minutes of effort a day, they use blogs (which are web pages that are easy to edit) to reach a massive audience. They can develop a worldwide reputation as an expert in their field. These MBAs don’t blog about parties or their dog. They blog business topics like marketing or financial derivatives. Even with traffic of only 5 to 10 people a day, that quickly translates into over 1,000 people who know who they are, and respect their knowledge and opinions.

This is from Rod’s whitepaper “The Next Wave in Productivity Tools – Web Office White Paper” in which he discusses how many Web2.0 technologies and the folks who use them are entering the corporate world. It’s well worth the read.

Thanks to John for sending this on to me.

blog, blogging, web, web 2.0, internet, information technology, technology, web office