Cold up here in New Hampshire

Cold enough at the Mount Washington Observatory that boiling water tossed in the air turns to snow instantly!

How cold? -34.8F Yeah, that’s cold.

The video was done earlier today by the Mount Washington Observatory Staff. The observatory is like a fallout shelter on the top of the mountain with some weather gear strapped on top. The staff has been known to do some wacky videos before, but it’ll be a lot more fun now that they’re posting them online.

Check out Water to Snow Round 1 which was done at a mere 22 below but with the aid of a 75MPH wind! It’s probably worth mentioning that Mount Washington is the location of the strongest wind gust ever recorded at a hasty 231MPH.

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2006 Tropical Storm/Hurricane Names

National Weather ServiceAfter a record 28 named storms last year, NOAA is predicting 13 to 16 named Atlantic storms this year. While that number seems low it is still above average, and perhaps more astonishing is the fact that our first named storm, tropical storm Alberto has already made a pass over Florida!

As a sneak preview, here are the 21 names set aside for this year’s tropical storms/hurricanes. NOAA even has the next five years already listed.

  1. Alberto
  2. Beryl
  3. Chris
  4. Debby
  5. Ernesto
  6. Florence
  7. Gordon
  8. Helene
  9. Isaac
  10. Joyce
  11. Kirk
  12. Leslie
  13. Michael
  14. Nadine
  15. Oscar
  16. Patty
  17. Rafael
  18. Sandy
  19. Tony
  20. Valerie
  21. William

In addition to setting the record for the most named storms last year, we also retired more storm names last year than any other. A storm name is retired if there is sufficient loss of life or property to make in inappropriate to reuse the name. Dennis, Katrina, Rita, Stan and Wilma were all retired last year. If a name is not retired it will be reused seven years later.

For the most straight-up, factual information about tropical storms and hurricanes visit the National Hurricane Center’s site. For the best local weather with no ads check out weather.gov.

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Hurricane Wilma Info from the National Weather Service

National Weather Service LogoThe National Weather Service has once again provided a wealth of information on Hurricane Wilma. Check out their page on Wilma for projected path, satellite images (updated every 30 minutes) and much more.

You won’t find any videos of the destruction, or suicidal news reporters out in 100 MPH winds, but you will find plenty of factual information about the storm.

Wondering what the next name is after Wilma? The list of names (maintained by the World Meteorological Orginization) does not use names starting with x, y, or z, so after Wilma we will move on to Hurricane Alpha, then Beta, Gamma, etc. throught the greek alphabet. For more information on hurricane naming, check out the National Hurricane Center’s page on the topic.

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High Water in Plymouth

high waterWondering how high the water really was when I came over the temporary bridge on the Pemigewasset into Plymouth this morning I went straight to the folks who track these things.

The U.S. Geological Survey tracks river and stream data for many points on many streams in the US and they’re nice enough to put it on their website. Their site will never win any awards for web design, but the information is there, even with a webcam (updated hourly or so.) The information on the Pemi in Plymouth is available here, or look up realtime streamflow data for your area here.

The USGS also posts great historical data on their site if you’re interested in doing some data mining!

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Better Weather Forecast: An Update

National Weather Service LogoIn my previous post Better Weather Forecast I encouraged folks to try out the National Weather Service website for local forecasts without the irritating ads that The Weather Channel seems to run.

Well, one of my primary gripes about the National Weather Service has always been their obscure domain name, nws.noaa.gov, was always a bit tough to remember, and it made it tough to spread the word too.

They seem to have gotten around to updating some links non their site and I noticed that many of their links now go to weather.gov! This makes things much easier!

So either I’ve been missing it this whole time, or they’ve decided to start using this domain. Either way, check out weather.gov for your local forecast national coverage, and even hurricane information! It’s still better than weather.com, and now it’s easier to remember!

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