SunFire T2000 Try and Buy

SunFireT2000After being tipped of on the Sun try-and-buy program by Alan Baker, a coworker and cohort, I figured I’d throw my hat into the ring for a chance to test drive a SunFire T2000… and today it arrived.

Here’s what Sun has to say about their program:

Toss your toughest workloads at the multithreaded Sun Fire T2000 server with the Solaris 10 Operating System, and watch it crank up your database and Web application performance.

We’re so confident in the quality and performance of the world’s first eco-responsible server, we’re offering a free 60-day trial, risk-free. If you’re not totally impressed, just send it back at our expense and owe us nothing.

Chances are that you will be dazzled by your trial server and come back for more. The new Sun Fire T2000 server will likely become your multithreaded workload energy-saving powerhouse of choice.

When you apply for the Try and Buy program you get the choice of a four, six, or eight core 1GHz UltraSPARC T1 processor. I chose the eight, not just because bigger is better, but also because it is closest to our production Oracle servers in capacity and price.

So once we can find the time we’ll get 64-bit Oracle installed on there and run it through the paces. On deck are some join, function, lookup intensive datamart creation scripts which currently crush our production server every evening. This should be fun.

Also of interest is Sun’s claim of this server being “the world’s first eco-responsible server”. While I am unlikely to bring in a kilowatt meter to verify these claims, we are a very green university and hey, everyone wants to save a few bucks on electric.

UPDATE: I have now had the chance to test drive some Oracle jobs on this system. Check out my findings here.

oracle, database, database administration, database administrator, dba, dbms, rdbms, sun, solaris, systems administration, system administration, sysadmin, unix, t2000, try and buy, sunfire

UNIX Load Averages Explained

If you’ve spent much time working in a UNIX environment you’ve probably seen the load averages more than a few times.

load averages: 2.43, 2.96, 3.41

I have to admit that even in my sysadmin days I didn’t fully understand what these numbers were, but Zach did some digging a while ago to try to understand where these numbers are comming from.

In his blog entry from late last year, Zach sums it up quite nicely:

In short it is the average sum of the number of processes waiting in the run-queue plus the number currently executing over 1, 5, and 15 minute time periods.

The formula is a bit more complicated than that, but this serves well as a functional definition. Zach provides a bit more detail in his article and also points out Dr. Neil Gunther’s article on the topic which has as much depth on the topic as anyone could ever ask.

So what does this mean about your system?

Well, for a quick example let’s consider the output below. The load average of a system can typically be found by running top or uptime and users typically don’t need any special privileges for these commands.

load averages: 2.43, 2.96, 3.41

Here we see the one minute load average is 2.43, five minute is 2.96, and fifteen minute load average is 3.41.

Here are some conclusions we can draw from this.

  • On average, over the past one minute there have been 2.43 processes running or waiting for a resource
  • Overall the load is on a down-trend since the average number of processes running or waiting in the past minute (2.43) is lower than the average running or waiting over the past 5 minutes (2.96) and 15 minutes (3.41)
  • This system is busy, but we cannot conclude how busy solely from load averages.

It is important here to mention that the load average does not take into account the number of processes. Another critical detail is that processes could be waiting for any number of things including CPU, disk, or network.

So what we do know is that a system that has a load average significantly higher than the number of CPUs is probably pretty busy, or bogged down by some bottleneck. Conversely a system which has a load average significantly lower than the number of CPUs is probably doing just fine.

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UNIX, systems administration, sysadmin, solaris, linux, load averages, system monitoring, sun, mac, osx

Oracle Prefers Solaris 10

It looks like Oracle is re-aligning themselves with Sun Solaris as their preferred 64-bit platform. In the March issue of Oracle Magazine they have a short announcement on the topic:

Oracle has chosen the Solaris 10, Sun Microsystems’ multiplatform, open source operating system, as its preferred development and deployment platform for most 64-bit architectures. Solaris 10 will be used throughout Oracle’s development organization, and Oracle will release and ship 64-bit versions of all Oracle products on Solaris prior to, or simultaneously with, release on other operating systems.

Check out the whole article here or sign up to get your free copy of Oracle Magazine.

Thanks to Jon G. for sending this on to me.

oracle, database, database administration, dba, systems administration, sysadmin, solaris, sun, sun microsystems, UNIX, open source, 64-bit

EditPlus for SQL Editing and More

EditPlus in actionWhile there are many text editors out there offering a broad set of features my favorite right now is EditPlus.

EditPlus is a Windows shareware application designed for text, HTML, Java, PHP, etc. It’s very thin requiring little (nearly no) load time and has many great features such as:

  • Syntax hilighting for many languages
  • EditPlus on Windows right-click
  • FTP and SFTP integration
  • Templates
  • Line Numbering
  • Column Selection
  • Optional Spell Checker

The list of features is long and every revision brings more. Check out the Features page for more.

I’ve been using the Oracle 9iR2 syntax file from the user files section of EditPlus.com and it seems to pick up all the SQL and PL/SQL syntax I use, although many other syntax files exist and you could always make your own.

As mentioned above, EditPlus is shareware. A single user license is only $30, and with discounts for buying in bulk there is no reason not to pay, but for now, download it, try it, and see why you can’t live without it.

Thanks to Zach for showing this to me a couple years ago.

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