The Rule of the Lazy Class

Approach.Botonomy.com has an interesting article on Why the Puritan Work Ethic has No Place in IT.

The article echoes many of my personal sentiments that your administrators and developers need to be encouraged to work smarter, not harder, even to the point of having “free time.”

… You want an environment where sysadmins kick back and read IT magazines occasionally, because their run-of-the-mill administrative tasks (adding users, managing disk space, etc.) are all scripted and/or automated. They can then focus their energies on the unexpected and unavoidable issues that crop up from time-to-time.

Beyond handling the unexpected, through having this “free time” administrators will have the ability to identify areas in need of improvement. If your administrators are running around fixing stuff all the time your team has a problem! Not only will morale, and therefore retention suffer but your administrators will have no time for evaluating new opportunities.

The best teams celebrate those who sit back and let their computers do their work for them. You want to have a project team that considers repetitive development activities to be tasteless. Sometimes necessary, but generally frowned upon.

Check out the full article and think a bit about what your team could be doing if they weren’t fighting fires all the time.

Of course this is exactly why I am writing a book on Oracle Shell Scripting due out next year.

project management, it management, information technology, database administration, system administration

Thank You Oracle

Yesterday Scott Maziarz got this error in the log of an Oracle Application Server instance:

[Tue May 16 13:27:52 2006] [warn] long lost child came home! (pid 8134)

I can’t decide if this is a good thing or a bad thing.

funny, fun, error, error message, oracle, oracle application server, oas, dba, system administration, sysadmin, database administration

Renewing Secure Certificates in Oracle Application Server

After having to do this several times in the past few weeks I have updated my directions on managing secure certificates in OAS to include importing a renewed OAS certificate.

application administration, oas, oracle application server, sysadmin, system administration, oracle

How Big Is That UNIX Directory?

Need to know how much space a directory and its contents are taking up on your UNIX system? Here’s what I use:

du -ks directory

The du command is used to summarize disk usage. Without any flags will show you the usage in blocks for every directory and subdirectory specified. Since the number of blocks varies by operating system we add the -k option to specify that we want the output in kilobytes. In many operating systems you could also use -h for a “human-readable” output with abbreviations like B for bytes, K for kilobytes, M for megabytes and so on.

The -s option lets us gather only the sum of the directory specified. Without the -s flag we would get output on every subdirectory as well as the specified directory.

$ du -k stuff
408560 stuff/patch
104 stuff/scripts
408688 stuff

One other thing that is useful for finding the biggest files and directories where there are a lot to sift through is to use a wildcard to size up multiple directories, then pipe the output of du to the sort command like this:

$ du -ks ./* | sort -n
0 ./sdtvolcheck727
8 ./mpztaWqc
8 ./speckeysd.lock
304 ./dtdbcache_:0
408688 ./stuff

With sort we use the -n option to order things by arithmetic value rather than alphabetic value (making 8 come before 304) so we see the largest things at the bottom.

Try it out. As always check the man pages for more info.

Easy Linux CommandsFor more tips like this check out my book Easy Linux Commands, only $19.95 from Rampant TechPress.

unix, solaris, linux, sysadmin, system administration, storage, storage administration

Getting Started with the Sun Fire T2000

SunFireT2000After receiving my try-and-buy Sun Fire T2000 over a week ago it’s finally up and running. While we have yet to hit it with much of a load, here are some thoughts on the out-of-box experience:

Before even powering up there are a couple interesting observations about the system. The first is the lack of power button, switch, or key. In fact there is only one button on the system and that is an indicator button which just flashes an LED on both the front and back of the system to make it easier to locate (a nice feature, by the way.) You’ll quickly find the hot-swappable dual power supply and fan compartment. The adventurous will find and the big button on top of the system which allows you to gain access to RAM and other non-hot-swappable components.

All of these compartments and components are accessible without the need for tools. The hard drives are on hot-swappable sleds which pop out the front of the box. The hard drives are small (2.5″ I believe) allowing room for 4 bays in the front and still affording enough space for ventilation. I was somewhat surprised to find laptop-style drives in a Sun server, but I guess I can’t come up with any reason not to.

After giving the hardware a good once-over it was time to get the T2000 up and running. I have to say Sun came up a little short on the out-of-box experience at this point. I’m comfortable with, even partial to the absence of on-board video on a server, and Sun has chosen to include serial via RJ-45 on the T2000. Sun was on the right track including two cables appropriately shielded for use with this port, but neglected to include an adapter to go to the 9 pin serial we all have on the back of our PCs.

After rummaging around for the proper adapter to hook the T2000 to an old laptop we plugged it in. The system is surprisingly (read obnoxiously) loud, but hey, it’s a server not a desktop. After a few minutes of the regular hardware diagnostics stuff the system came up to an sc> prompt.

This is where those who are not familiar with Sun’s newer hardware will come to a complete stop. The only documentation included with the system is the Sun Fire T2000 Server Getting Started Guide and that does little more than tell you what the different lights mean and where you can find more documentation online. If you get online and grab the Sun Fire T2000 Server Installation Guide this will walk you through dealing with the SC serial management port. In my opinion Sun should have included this one in hard copy with the system as well.

After a couple more steps things start to feel familiar and the rest of the setup is much like the Solaris 7, 8, and 9 installs I’m used to. With just a few extra steps here you can (and I’d recommend) configure the SC Network Management port which will allow you the same functionality as the SC Serial Management port without the need for the serial cable and adapter. You will need an extra network drop and IP address to use network management, but then you’ll be able to telnet to it for administrative functions. Of course in a production environment you’d want this behind a firewall or on a private subnet.

Other than that the system seems quick. Our next step is to get Oracle on the system and throw some queries at it. I’ll share more as soon as we get some results.

UPDATE: I have now had the chance to test drive some Oracle jobs on this system. Check out my findings here.

database, database administration, database administrator, dba, dbms, rdbms, solaris, sun, sunfire, sysadmin, system administration, systems administration, t2000, try and buy, unix, oracle