Oracle Shell Scripting: Another 5-star review!

Well, I’m glad to see that people are liking my book Oracle Shell Scripting: Linux and UNIX Programming for Oracle. Another 5-star review showed up on Amazon last week:

Jolly writes:

Great book!

A well written book. A great way to learn shell scripting. Relevant and useful examples throughout the book (downloadable code).

Thanks for the review Jolly!

Oracle Shell ScriptingFor more information like this check out my book Oracle Shell Scripting, only $34.95 from Rampant TechPress.

Buy it now!

Oracle Shell Scripting, another review

Another review for my book Oracle Shell Scripting: Linux and UNIX Programming for Oracle has shown up on Amazon!

Prashant wrote:

This book has helped me impress my colleagues and boss..I originally browsed through it at Border’s (and found myself sitting on the ground with a notepad scrambling to copy as much as possible)..of course, then I realized I had to have it, so I bought it online..I knew the publisher was a trustworthy source because I’m always using Don Burleson’s DBA tips online.. this author’s approach is easy-to-follow and concise; yet it’s a thorough guide that is like a catalyst for your own creativity…it has made me look forward to extracting the power of the shell.

It’s a lot better than parsing through thick UNIX encyclopedias or cycling through fragmented online an OCP 10g/9i DBA, I still feel like there are not enough practical day-to-day guides like this one for junior/mid/senior-level administrators, since over half our work is directly/indirectly connected to the shell.

Thanks for the great review Prashant! After all the work that goes into a book like this it’s great to know that it’s helping people. That’s what it’s all about, after all.

Oracle Shell ScriptingFor more information like this check out my book Oracle Shell Scripting, only $34.95 from Rampant TechPress.

Buy it now!

Solaris prtdiag output

Vikrant posted a comment on my previous post on getting hardware information in Solaris asking if I could explain the output of the prtdiag command in Solaris. Unfortunately the output varies quite a bit depending on what hardware you have, but here’s the output from my Ultra10.

$ /usr/platform/`uname -i`/sbin/prtdiag
System Configuration: Sun Microsystems sun4u Sun Ultra 5/10 UPA/PCI (UltraSPARC-IIi 440MHz)
System clock frequency: 110 MHz
Memory size: 1024 Megabytes

========================= CPUs =========================

Run Ecache CPU CPU
Brd CPU Module MHz MB Impl. Mask
--- --- ------- ----- ------ ------ ----
0 0 0 440 2.0 12 9.1

========================= IO Cards =========================

Bus# Freq
Brd Type MHz Slot Name Model
--- ---- ---- ---- -------------------------------- ----------------------
0 PCI-1 33 1 ebus
0 PCI-1 33 1 network-SUNW,hme
0 PCI-1 33 2 SUNW,m64B ATY,GT-C
0 PCI-1 33 3 ide-pci1095,646
0 PCI-2 33 2 pci108e,1000-pci108e,1000
0 PCI-2 33 2 SUNW,hme-pci108e,1001 SUNW,qsi-cheerio

No failures found in System

The “System Configuration” line shows vendor and model information as well as the processor version and speed. “System clock frequency” is the bus speed on the motherboard of the system. The processor speed is typically a multiple of the clock frequency.

The “Memory size” shows the total memory in the system. On most server-class systems there is additional output to show what size memory modules are in each slot in the system. This can be very useful for determining if memory can be added or if it will need to go in place of existing chips.

The “CPU” section has detailed information on each processor in the system. Again, this is far more interesting in a larger, multi-processor system. All the processors in a machine should have identical information. I don’t believe Sun systems allow mixing different processors.

The “I/O Cards” section will have information on cards added to the system but may also list I/O devices (drive controllers etc.) built into the motherboard.

So that’s the highlights. If anyone wants to send me the prtdiag output from a larger system I’ll gladly add that here with some details.

sun, solaris, system administration, sysadmin, unix

SSH Without A Password

Zach has posted a good quick reference for setting up SSH to use a shared key for authentication instead of a password on a UNIX system. It’s important to keep your keys secure, but this can allow you to set up scripts to execute commands or move files between multiple hosts without prompting for passwords.

If memory serves this type of authentication is enabled by default on most ssh servers, but if it doesn’t work talk to your sys-admin to see if it is disabled.

unix, linux, solaris, mac osx, osx, ssh, security

UNIX Find And Execute

Zach tells me I need to post how to find files and execute a command on those files. While the man pages are always the definitive reference, these are the options I use frequently. As usual, anything in italics should be replaced with the details for your search.

Note: WordPress loves to convert quotes into fancy quotes (pointing in from each side) so these commands may not work too well if copied and pasted. On the bright side, there’s no time like the present to start commiting these to muscle memory.

Find a file and execute a specific command:

find path conditions -exec command {} \;

find ./ -name "*.php" -exec cat {} \;

The open/close curly bracket marks where the name of each file found will be substituted and the backslash-semicolon marks the end of the command to execute.

Here are a few other options I use frequently:

Search for a file by name:

find path -name filename

find ./ -name style.css

Search by name with wildcards:

find path -name "filename"

find ./ -name "*.html"

Search for files modified within the past n days:

find path -mtime -n

find ./ -mtime -7

Search for files modified before the past n days:

find path -mtime +n

find /tmp -mtime +3

These are mostly based on my experience in Solaris using the bash shell. They should work just about everywhere, but check the man pages as mileage will vary.

Easy Linux CommandsFor more tips like this check out my book Easy Linux Commands, only $19.95 from Rampant TechPress.

Buy it now!

unix, solaris, linux, mac osx, osx, sysadmin, systems administration