Where’s my cardboard laptop?

Don Burleson points out that Oracle has sent out some Cardboard laptops!

Oracle cardboard laptop

The outside of the laptop which showed up in Andy Armstrong’s mail July 5th read “We’ve taken the idea that the outside world is a dangerous place for unprotected content.” and the inside reads “And shredded it.”

Thanks to Zach for posting the full text of the interior which reads:

“To derive maximum benefit from your business critical content, you need to share it across a wide user base. But the more people who have access to it, the greater the threat of sensitive information leaking to your competitors. That’s just for starters; content proliferation also raises the risk of regulatory non-compliance and escalating management costs. You know you can’t live without your information, but you’d be forgiven for wondering how to live with it.

Oracle’s recently acquired Information Rights Management solution can help. A key component of our Document and Records Management portfolio, it enables you to share your information when and with whom you want – without fear of the outside world.

But it doesn’t stop there. Should the worst happen – and your laptop falls into unsafe hands – we can even scamble your content before anyone works out how to access it.

We’ll be in touch shortly with more details of how to shred your content management worries.”

So what’s the story? What bandwagon is Oracle getting on here? Only time will tell. Burleson thinks it may be another step in their “unbreakable” theme. I think it may be something with Application Express as a content management system. Something to do with enterprise blogs or wiki or some other web 2.0 kind of content management.

wiki, blog, web, web20, web 2.0, oracle, dba, rdbms, dbms, marketing, laptop

Top Oracle Blogs

Andy C has posted a list of Oracle blogs he reads listed by Technorati ranking. Not only did Life After Coffee make the list, but it made #1!

Andy C posted a short history of Oracle blogging about a year ago. It seems there were a lot fewer back then.

Check out the whole list. There are some great folks on here, many of whom actually post primarily about Oracle!

oracle, database, dba, rdbms, blog

Interview with SearchSecurity.com

Earlier this week I was solicited for an interview with Bill Brenner, Senior News Writer for SearcSecurity.com on the topic of Oracle patches and their new Critical Patch Update bulletins.

Bill interviewed several DBAs and got some interesting opinions on Oracle’s patching procedures.

Jon Emmons, an Oracle database consultant and keeper of a blog called Life After Coffee, which focuses on Oracle security and other topics, said he also found the bulletin changes helpful.

“Perhaps the most valuable new feature in the CPU bulletin is the executive summaries,” Emmons said in an email interview. “These bulleted lists give a great high-level summary. At one point or another we’ve all had to explain to our boss why we need to apply these patches and now Oracle has given us the words to do it with.”

The full article, which came out yesterday, highlights mixed opinions on Oracle’s patching procedure and “improved” CPU bulletin.

oracle, patch, database, dba, database administration, rdbms, security, database security

Oracle Security Alerts Available via RSS

Last week I needed the latest security patch for a new install of Oracle Application Server. After spending an inordinate amount of time on Oracle’s site I finally found it. Then I thought “I wonder if there’s an RSS feed for this?”

So I copied the URL out of IE and into a modern browser (Firefox in this case) and sure enough, I got the familiar feed icon in the location bar. I then proceeded to add the link to my RSS aggregator and can now find the updates without hassle!

So, if you’re looking for the latest security alerts from Oracle, here’s the link If you are using a news aggregator or portal which allows RSS you should consider adding the URL to your aggregator so you’ll always have the links to the latest patches handy.

oracle, rdbms, security, database

RAID 5 and Oracle Databases

While researching the effect of RAID 5 disk configuration on Oracle databases I came accrost more than I thought I expected on the topic.

With disk as cheap as it is today there is no reason to ever use RAID 5 on an Oracle database. Even for a database which sees only a moderate amount of updates the performance loss incurred by using RAID 5 is too high. RAID 1 or some combination of RAID 1 and RAID 0 should be used when high availability is required. Database 10g users should also consider allowing Oracle’s new Automatic Storage Management to handle redundancy on un-mirrored disks (or even raw partitions.)

But don’t take my word for it. Here are some opinions from some notable Oracle administrators:

Oracle Database RAID 5
Mark Rittman

No RAID5. Use RAW whenever possible and consider RAID10 or 0+1. RAID 5 can severely affect performance on highly updated databases.

Oracle Database Administration: The Essential Reference
David Kreines & Brian Laskey

RAID-5 is, in fact, very powerful and inexpensive. It is also a technology to be avoided in most cases when configuring your Oracle database! This may seem a harsh statement, but the reality is that although RAID-5 provides good levels of data protection at a low monetary cost, this comes at a very high cost for disk I/O. In particular, write operations on RAID-5 arrays can be orders of magnitude slower than the same operations on a single disk.

Oracle and RAID usage
Mike Ault

Use RAID10 when possible, RAID5 if it is not. Size the array based on IO needs first, then storage capacity and you can’t go wrong.

Disk Management for Oracle
Donald Burleson

Oracle recommends using (SAME) Stripe And Mirror Everywhere (a.k.a., RAID 1+0) for all systems that experience significant updates. This is because of the update penalty with RAID 5 architectures.

Using RAID 5 for a high-update Oracle system can be disastrous to performance, yet many disk vendors continue to push RAID 5 as a viable solution for highly updated systems.

RAID 5 is not recommended for high-update Oracle systems. The performance penalty from the parity checking will clobber Oracle performance.

If you’re still not convinced check out Baarf.com. This site is committed to the Battle Against Any Raid Five (or four or free, uh, three.) The site has links to several more articles exposing the perils of RAID 5.

oracle, rdbms, dba, systems administration, sysadmin, raid, raid 5