No TWiT this week, future uncertain?

Leo Laporte reported today that there would be no TWiT (This Week in Tech) podcast for the next couple weeks and he’s not sure what the future of the show will be:

I’ll decide what happens to TWiT, the show, when I come back, but at this point it looks like it’s on life support and the heart monitor is flatlining.

Leo already has over 100 comments on the story which is only a few hours old. While I don’t envy him the hours he’ll likely spend reading the comments, I love the show so much I had to add my two cents worth:


I know how exhausting it can be to keep pouring your heart into something while others treat it as a hobby.

But, that’s what it is to some. I learned a long time ago, while managing student workers, that it’s important to remember what a job, project, podcast (or is that netcast) means to the others involved, not just what it means to you.

It sounds like you still want to do TWiT, and the tech news isn’t going to stop coming. Consider how you could re-engage some of the other twits. Is there a better time for others? Would a shorter format be easier? Are there topics they want to cover that you don’t normally hit on?

As much as I’m a big fan of the current TWiT regulars there are plenty of people out there with opinions. Perhaps you need a larger pool of regulars. When I want to play poker I always invite twice as many people as I want to have play knowing half will cancel for some (completely valid) reason or another.

Is it a TWiT without Patrick and John? I think so. Maybe just a different TWiT. You’ve got an established name, a big audience and even a sponsor. Why start something completely new when you’ve got these things going for you?

But, on a completely selfish level, please, please, please, please, PLEASE don’t stop making TWiT, and thank you and all the other twits for making so many great episodes.


technology, computer, news, information technology

Life After Coffee On TV!

It seems that WGN-TV in Chicago did a video for Morning Sidekick’s parody song “My Cubicle” and even mentioned Life After Coffee on the air!

Unfortunately their site makes it nearly impossible to link directly to the video, but if you go to their morning news page you can find it in the Morning News Video section titled “Surfin’ the Net, My Cubicle Parody”.

The video is fairly boring, but somehow fits a song about how boring it is to work in cubicles. I’m not even sure the people in the video knew they were being shot.

Thanks to espressoshots (a reader) for commenting that this site made the news!

news, video, funny, parody

Gates to step down!

Earlier today Bill Gates announced that he would leave his day-to-day role at Microsoft to devote more time to charitable works.

At a news conference today Gates had the following to say:

“I believe with great wealth comes great responsibility – the responsibility to give back to society and make sure those resources are given back in the best possible way, to those in need,” he said. Gates added, “It’s not a retirement, it’s a reordering of my priorities.”

There are unconfirmed reports that Gates then snuck off to put on his Spidey suit.

Does this mean I’m not allowed to hate Bill Gates anymore?

microsoft, bill gates, news, software

Stealth Advertising

Just when I thought I had enough reasons to hate the entertainment industry they come up with an idea like this.

From a recent Reuters article on

A breakthrough in television advertising debuted without fanfare last spring as a brand-name box of crackers appeared on the CBS sitcom ”Yes, Dear” for about 20 seconds, seen but hardly noticed by millions of viewers.

Unbeknownst to them, the image of Kellogg’s Club Crackers had been digitally painted onto the top of a coffee table after the scene was filmed, launching the latest advance in a marketing practice known in the industry as product placement but derided by critics as ”stealth advertising.”

This is worse than the advertisements which now seem to frequent the bottom third of the screen as you’re trying to watch your favorite program. At least when Shrek started popping his ugly head into the frame you knew you were seeing an advertisement!

Now when you see a box of crackers, pop-tarts, a box of trojans, a bottle of Coke, or a BMW in a series you’ll never know if it was put there by a careful writer, a skilled set dresser, or just a network advertising department who has no interest in the artistic integrity of the show.

Now I’m not naive enough to think the entertainment industry hasn’t been taking payoffs for putting brand name products in their shows, but at least it was part of the original composition, not an afterthought. There can be some give-and-take between the advertisers and the writers and, while advertising is inevitable, at least there are some checks.

So where does this end? Well, my bitching probably won’t get them to stop placing ads in more and more programming, so I’d like to offer this suggestion for the future of “stealth advertising.”

Advertising in the news. That’s right, the news. Try these on for size…

Would George W. like a cracker? (or should that be “Is George W. like a cracker?”)


How about some great moments in history? Everyone needs crackers…

There were crackers on the moon right?


What’s a war without crackers?


You can go great places with crackers!


And my personal favorite.


Tasteless? Well, yes, but since we’ve already turned anything artistic into a commercial, what’s left? Just the news.

advertising, internet advertising, humor, funny, stealth advertising, george w. bush, bush, news, entertainment