Blogger Recreates Blog from Google Cache

GoogleAfter a catastrophic disk failure a long-time blogger was faced with complete data loss.

“I had the database backed up into a separate directory, but unfortunately it was on the same disk as the live one, so when that disk died I lost everything” the blog administrator sheepishly admitted. “I wasn’t sure what I could do. Professional data recovery is costly and not guaranteed, and the thought of starting again from scratch after having hundreds of stories was daunting. Then it struck me… Google has all my data!”

OK, so this never really happened, but why couldn’t it? Of course you’d have to manually copy and paste all your content, but if you were trying to recover from complete data loss on a public-facing web server you could conceivably recover all your text, with markup, from Google’s cache.

Go ahead and try it. Go to Google and search for your site. Right now the search “site:www.lifeaftercoffee.com” returns 376 results (or actually ‘376 Wesuwts’ since I changed my language to Elmer Fudd) and from those cached pages I was easily able to find most of my content.

Remember to backup often and to a secure location separate from where your server is, but if you’re ever trying to get a page or site back from the dead, Google may just save your bacon.

google, disaster recovery, blogs, internet, information technology

DNS Report

After having some DNS problems of his own, Casey over at MaisonBisson.com points out a great DNS examination tool.

DNSReport.com is nice tool for verifying your sites DNS records. It’s nothing fancy, but similar to Internet Traffic Report could be indispensable for troubleshooting website problems.

dns, internet, network, network administration, troubleshooting, networking

Blogs.Oracle.com

OracleOracle has taken an interesting step, and I hope others will follow.

Blogs.Oracle.com seems to have been created as an Oracle blogroll! Why is this important? Well, for one thing it means Oracle is encouraging their employees to blog, but additionally they are also linking to non-employee blogs.

Here’s the introduction from Blogs.Oracle.com:

Welcome to the Oracle blogging community, where Oracle executives, employees, and non-employees alike exchange views about best practices for using Oracle and industry-standard technologies. This continuous feedback loop helps Oracle stay in touch with the needs of the overall community, so keep those comments coming!

This not only validates what others have been saying regarding the value of blogging in the corporate environment, but also recognizes the role that non-employees play in the big picture.

Check it out at Blogs.Oracle.com. Right now there are a couple dozen employee blogs and fourty-something non-employee blogs. Hopefully they’ll stay on top of adding new folks as they come along.

blogging, information technology, internet, technology, web, web 2.0, web office, blog, database, database administration, database programming, dba, pl/sql, plsql, sql, oracle

Why blog?

Every once in a while I revisit the question of why I blog. Not because I doubt that I should, but because I see by blog as a living, evolving part of my personal and professional self.

Rod Boothby of Innovation Creators sums it up nicely in reference to MBA students:

With 10 minutes of effort a day, they use blogs (which are web pages that are easy to edit) to reach a massive audience. They can develop a worldwide reputation as an expert in their field. These MBAs don’t blog about parties or their dog. They blog business topics like marketing or financial derivatives. Even with traffic of only 5 to 10 people a day, that quickly translates into over 1,000 people who know who they are, and respect their knowledge and opinions.

This is from Rod’s whitepaper “The Next Wave in Productivity Tools – Web Office White Paper” in which he discusses how many Web2.0 technologies and the folks who use them are entering the corporate world. It’s well worth the read.

Thanks to John for sending this on to me.

blog, blogging, web, web 2.0, internet, information technology, technology, web office

Consider the Source…

My sister Carla points out an interesting detail in a survey she was solicited to take recently…

Please note that this study uses the Behavioral Lab’s new Inquisit system, which requires you to download a special applet. We regret that at this time, Inquisit studies only work on PCs running Internet Explorer. If you have not already downloaded this applet, you will be asked to do so when you link to the survey.

Now I’m not sure what this survey was for (and Carla didn’t mention on her LiveJournal) but we’ll assume it was targeted at only internet-savvy computer users, but wait, you also have to be on a PC, running Internet Explorer, and you need to be willing, able and patient enough to download their applet?

Hold it a minute… If I wanted to solicit bored geeks with no security concerns I’d just go phishing…

Who is responsible for the scientific integrity of this survey? Would you believe Stanford University?

survey, technology, computer, internet, browser, internet explorer, firefox