Finally on DVD and ready for preorder on Amazon, the video of Pink Floyd’s final concert tour, “Pulse”. I wrote about this before, but at that time it was not available to pre-order at most sites. Due for release on December 6th, this is certainly a must-have for the Floyd fan on your Christmas list.

Here’s the rumored track list and extras. This was a fantastic concert and my VHS is long overdue for replacement. The DVD extras and Dolby Digital soundtrack are just icing on the cake.

PULSEDisc 1

Concert Part 1:
Shine On
Learning To Fly
High Hopes
Take It Back
Coming Back To Life
Sorrow
Keep Talking
Another Brick In The Wall (part 2)
One of These Days

Screen Films:
Shine On
High Hopes
Learning to Fly

Bootlegging the Bootleggers:
What Do You Want From Me
On The Turning Way
Poles Apart
Marooned

Shorts:
Time (Eames)
Money (Alien)
Speak To Me 1987
Pulse TV Advert

Videos:
Learning To Fly
Take It Back

Disc 2

Concert Part 2:
Speak To Me
Breathe
On The Run
Time
The Great Gig In The Sky
Money
Us And Them
Brain Damage
Eclipse
Wish You Were Here
Comfortably Numb
Run Like Hell

Screen Films:
Speak To Me (graphic)
On The Run
Time 1994
The Great Gig in the Sky (wave)
Money
Us And Them 1987
Brain Damage
Eclipse

Alternate Screen Films:
The Great Gig In The Sky (animation)
Us And Them 1994

Behind the Scenes Footage:
Goodbye to Life As We Know It

Wish You Were Here:
Rock and Roll Hall of Fame Induction Ceremony

Photo Gallery

National Weather Service LogoThe National Weather Service has once again provided a wealth of information on Hurricane Wilma. Check out their page on Wilma for projected path, satellite images (updated every 30 minutes) and much more.

You won’t find any videos of the destruction, or suicidal news reporters out in 100 MPH winds, but you will find plenty of factual information about the storm.

Wondering what the next name is after Wilma? The list of names (maintained by the World Meteorological Orginization) does not use names starting with x, y, or z, so after Wilma we will move on to Hurricane Alpha, then Beta, Gamma, etc. throught the greek alphabet. For more information on hurricane naming, check out the National Hurricane Center’s page on the topic.

hurricane wilma, wilma, hurricane, weather, storm, tropical storm, national weather service, nws, noaa

Thanks to a recent product upgrade a sequence in one of our databases was reset to about 100,000 below its previous value. To reset it Oracle, and most other sites, tell me I need to drop the sequence and recreate it to change its current value.

To avoid dropping the sequence and invalidating all the triggers and anything else that is dependent on it I decided a different approach was in order.

I first determined the difference between the trigger and the maximum value in the table. I then changed the amount it increments with to the difference (plus a few to be save), selected nextval, then change it back to increment by 1.

The commands were something like this:

alter sequence id_sequence increment by 142900;

select id_sequence.nextval from dual;

alter sequence id_sequence increment by 1;

This method of course only works to increase the sequence. One additional risk is that something will increment the trigger while the increment is set high. In this case you’re stuck dropping the sequence and recreating it. Just remember, if it comes to this you’ll want to recompile all invalid objects so they won’t slow down the next time they run.

oracle, sql, dba, database administration, database development

Earlier today a situation came up where a UNIX timestamp (a count of the number of seconds from January 1, 1970, midnight GMT) needed to be converted into an Oracle DATE format. The Oracle TO_DATE (covered in more detail in my article Oracle, SQL, Dates and Timestamps) does not support this type of conversion.

A Google search confirmed for me that their was no easy way to make the TO_DATE function do this, but I did find this article from the Oracle + PHP Cookbook on Oracle’s site which contained this simple function to convert UNIX timestamps to Oracle dates.

[SQL]CREATE OR REPLACE
FUNCTION unixts_to_date(unixts IN PLS_INTEGER) RETURN DATE IS
/**
* Converts a UNIX timestamp into an Oracle DATE
*/
unix_epoch DATE := TO_DATE(‘19700101000000′,’YYYYMMDDHH24MISS’);
max_ts PLS_INTEGER := 2145916799; — 2938-12-31 23:59:59
min_ts PLS_INTEGER := -2114380800; — 1903-01-01 00:00:00
oracle_date DATE;

BEGIN

IF unixts > max_ts THEN
RAISE_APPLICATION_ERROR(
-20901,
‘UNIX timestamp too large for 32 bit limit’
);
ELSIF unixts < min_ts THEN RAISE_APPLICATION_ERROR( -20901, 'UNIX timestamp too small for 32 bit limit' ); ELSE oracle_date := unix_epoch + NUMTODSINTERVAL(unixts, 'SECOND'); END IF; RETURN (oracle_date); END; / [/SQL] Once compiled, you can use the function to convert numerical UNIX timestamps into Oracle dates in the same manner you would use the TO_DATE function to convert text to dates. Here is an example: SQL> select unixts_to_date(1094165422) from dual;

UNIXTS_TO
---------
02-SEP-04

oracle, sql, dba, database administration, database development, unix, unix timestamp, timestamp

Make Magazine’s weblog has an article today on Nasa’s Blue Marble.

It seems Nasa has taken it upon themselves to provide a season-changing flyover of the world. Watch this video (my favorite) cycle through the equivalent of 4 years seasons while you fly from the Gulf of Mexico to New England. This short video must be the coolest thing since Google Earth.

Even more dramatic is the video of the Alps, but the video that will change how you picture our planet is the main tour, which pans over a major portion of the globe over several years worth of seasons.

Check out NASA’s page on The Blue Marble for more info, some high resolution satellite photos, and more.

What next? I’d like to see Google Earth offer the ability to dial a season when flying around.

Thanks to Make Magazine for posting this.

blue marble, satellite images, satellite photography, modis, terra, terra satellite, earth, google earth, nasa

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