Every once in a while I revisit the question of why I blog. Not because I doubt that I should, but because I see by blog as a living, evolving part of my personal and professional self.

Rod Boothby of Innovation Creators sums it up nicely in reference to MBA students:

With 10 minutes of effort a day, they use blogs (which are web pages that are easy to edit) to reach a massive audience. They can develop a worldwide reputation as an expert in their field. These MBAs don’t blog about parties or their dog. They blog business topics like marketing or financial derivatives. Even with traffic of only 5 to 10 people a day, that quickly translates into over 1,000 people who know who they are, and respect their knowledge and opinions.

This is from Rod’s whitepaper “The Next Wave in Productivity Tools – Web Office White Paper” in which he discusses how many Web2.0 technologies and the folks who use them are entering the corporate world. It’s well worth the read.

Thanks to John for sending this on to me.

blog, blogging, web, web 2.0, internet, information technology, technology, web office

My sister Carla points out an interesting detail in a survey she was solicited to take recently…

Please note that this study uses the Behavioral Lab’s new Inquisit system, which requires you to download a special applet. We regret that at this time, Inquisit studies only work on PCs running Internet Explorer. If you have not already downloaded this applet, you will be asked to do so when you link to the survey.

Now I’m not sure what this survey was for (and Carla didn’t mention on her LiveJournal) but we’ll assume it was targeted at only internet-savvy computer users, but wait, you also have to be on a PC, running Internet Explorer, and you need to be willing, able and patient enough to download their applet?

Hold it a minute… If I wanted to solicit bored geeks with no security concerns I’d just go phishing…

Who is responsible for the scientific integrity of this survey? Would you believe Stanford University?

survey, technology, computer, internet, browser, internet explorer, firefox

Kill Bill Redub
OK, so this person has:

    a) too much time on their hands
    b) a warped sense of humor
    c) a perverse affinity for vintage games
    d) a warped sense of foley
    e) all of the above

Check out this video from GorillaMask.net and choose for yourself. My vote is for e) all of the above.

Thanks to Tom for passing this one on.

movies, games, video games, computer games, fighting, fight scene, tom mundell, funny, nintendo, mario brothers, mario

First-and-TenWith the Super Bowl being this weekend lots of people like me (who can’t stand not knowing how something works) will be sitting around wondering “How do they paint the first-down line on the TV?”

Since 1998, Sportvision has provided many of the major networks with the technology called “1st & Ten” to paint the first-down line on the screen.

How does the line get there?

Well, the short answer is a computer analyzes the position of the camera on the field, takes into account zoom and the angle the camera is at, and where the first down line is, and draws the line on the image.

Why doesn’t the line cover the players?

There is a carefully calibrated color pallet of all the colors on the field, and another color pallet of all the colors of players’ uniforms, skin, the ball, and anything else which the line should not be painted on.

Before the line is drawn, very pixel on screen is then compared against these two color pallets. If the pixel matches a color in the field pallet the line is drawn on that pixel, if it matches the non-field pallet the line is not drawn.

Of course all of this has to happen 30 times a second to keep up with moving cameras and players, so as you can imagine it takes some serious computer power.

For more detail, check out Sportvision’s description of the technology or How the First-Down Line Works from HowStuffWorks.com.

sports, football, technology, television, tv, super bowl, superbowl

Mmmmm... Spam.Has anyone else noticed that if you’re looking at your Spam folder in Gmail there is a link at the top for a Spam recipe?

Google typically places a web clip from a popular news site at the top of the mail view, but in the Spam folder you’ll get a random Spam recipe from RecipeSource.com.

Yup, Spam. Not gag recipes either! Legitimate recipes for things like Spam Breakfast Burritos, French Fry Spam Casserole, and even Spam Primavera.

So if you’re sitting around wondering how you should prepare that Spam you bought for dinner, remember Gmail has the answer.

spam, gmail, email, internet, entertainment, cooking, recipe, food

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