“Sour mix”, also known as “Sweet and Sour mix” is a bartender’s shortcut used in recipes which would otherwise call for both lemon juice and sugar syrup. Today, most recipes call directly for sour mix.

After being disappointed with every commercial sour mix and powder we could find, Alan and I decided it was time to try to make our own. After many nights of experimentation we finally settled on this very simple recipe.

Combine in a 1 quart (1 liter) pitcher or bottle:

  • 18 oz Water
  • 12 oz RealLemon brand lemon juice
  • 1/2 cup sugar

Mix well and use in your favorite drink recipe. Highly recommended for Long Island Ice Tea.

While you could certainly make this with fresh lemon juice, Alan and I have yet to put in the effort. Even with the bottled lemon juice this is already much better (and cheaper) than any of the commercial offerings.

drinks, drink, drink mixing, alcohol, cocktail

Foreplay For DummiesTwo great new “Make Your Own” pages from Burleson Consulting’s Daily Oracle News Page:

Make Your Own “For Dummies” Book Cover

Make Your Own South Park Character

So here are your challenges for the day:

First, make a “For Dummies” book that isn’t safe to hang in your cube.

Second, render your boss as a South Park character.

If that’s not enough “Make Your Own” for you, check out the Make Your Own Warning Label site.


entertainment, fun, funny, humor, label, warning label, south park, office humor

FingerprintDon Burleson over at Burleson Consulting has written an interesting survey of Oracle biometrics applications.

With the inherent problems associated with passwords Oracle security administrators are finding that Oracle biometrics is a more secure and cost-effective solution. Oracle biometrics system offer more secure environments and also remove the need to dedicate a help-desk person to manage changing passwords for hundreds of end-users.

It’s interesting to see what’s out there, but as Zach will always remind us, biometrics will not hold up in the long run. As biometrics become commonplace they will be hacked. What will you do when someone steals your fingerprints (or the digital representation of them.) You can’t change them. Hell, you can’t even keep from leaving them behind just about everywhere you go.

If a lock can be opened, it can be picked; and if your password can be used, it can be forged. The more common biometrics become (Don mentions in his article that fingerprint readers are now less than $31) the more folks will set their sights on hacking them. These devices work on common interfaces and pass their information over networks potentially exposing your personal password to unknown parties.

If biometrics catch on you could be required to provide fingerprint identification to use your credit card at your local convenience store. Do you really trust them, or worse yet, the government (who can’t even keep your SSN secure) with your password to your bank account, business account, desktop computer and medical history?

So if biometrics isn’t the holy grail of electronic security what is?

I don’t know what the future of password management is. The most holistic solution I’ve seen yet is the one that Zach and I proposed last year where users are provided with a “password change authorization code” which they are encouraged to keep with their birth certificate (or in another safe place) which allows them to change their password through a self-service page in the case of password loss.

biometrics, fingerprint, security, hacking, hacks, oracle

Fill a pint glass with ice. Add:

  • .5 oz Vodka
  • .5 oz Rum
  • .5 oz Gin
  • .5 oz Tequila
  • .5 oz Triple Sec

Top off glass with:

Add:

  • Splash of cola

beverage, cocktail, drink, drinking, martini, scotch, whiskey, whisky, alcohol

Agent 18 VideoShieldFor the record, choosing an iPod was easy, choosing a case was very, very difficult.

Finally fed up with waiting for the battery replacement on my 10GB 3rd generation iPod I went out and bought myself a black 60GB iPod last week.

I couldn’t be happier with the device, but then there was the real dilemma… Which case to get…

Too many choices. When all was said and done I settled on the Agent 18 VideoShield. I had seen an Agent 18 on a coworker’s nano and it seemed to fit the bill.

I got the case earlier this week and it’s fantastic. The case is hard plastic and protects the back, body and screen very well.

Pros

  • Clear case does not change look of iPod
  • Covers screen
  • Allows access to all ports and hold switch
  • Prevents scratches
  • Hard case gives solid feel
  • Click wheel is not covered to allow easy use
  • The case adds only a minimum amount of bulk to the iPod
  • Installation and removal are both easy

Cons

  • Case does not protect against shock
  • Others have mentioned sand and dirt can enter the case resulting in scratches
  • iPod will not sit in some docks with case on

At $25 the price is right in line with other cases. The bigger problem could be finding it. I got mine at The Apple Store.

Overall the Agent 18 VideoShield comes highly recommended.

ipod, apple, apple ipod, video ipod, mp3, mp3 player

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