While applying a firmware upgrade to my Linksys WRT54G router today I encountered the following error:

Upgrade are failed!

This is right up there with “All your base are belong to us!”

On the up side, Linksys support was fairly helpful. Despite asking me “Have you tried to check the memory of your computer?” and “Have you tried to change the browser settings?” (those are exact quotes from the live chat) they got me to a download of the firmware that worked.

Overall, for $50 (on Amazon) the Linksys WRT54G router has been a damned solid and easy to configure wireless router with the nice benefit of four wired ports (in addition to the uplink.)
error message, funny, fun, humor, bad translation, bad english, engrish, router, wireless, internet

Get clean with poo!Stuck for a Valentines gift this year? Show your feelings with a big steaming pile of poo!

This isn’t just some plastic dog poop; it’s actually cappuccino scented hand soap. Available from Nope, It’s soap!

There is no doubt that your sweetheart will think of you every time they rub these little nuggets on their hands.

For just $7.95 (shipping included) this is definitely the shittiest gift since the Luwak Coffee gift pack.

If your relationship just isn’t ready for the gift of poo, maybe you need Cheetos Lip Balm. Now there’s a good idea. I’m sure this is made from the same orange goo that coats your fingers as you devour Cheetos.

Thanks again to Don Burleson for sending on these fine gift ideas.


valentines, poop, poo, turd, shit, dog shit, dog poop, cheetos

While digging for some details on the NLS language settings in Oracle today I came across a great FAQ on the topic right on Oracle’s site.

The FAQ includes such topics as:
NLS_LANG Parameter Fundamentals
Checking the current NLS_LANG Settings
How to setup the NLS_LANG Property for UNIX
Where to set the NLS_LANG in Windows
A Whole Pile of Other Frequently Asked Questions

Check out the NLS_LANG FAQ if you’re looking to learn about the NLS_LANG and associated settings or to find the answers to many common questions on these parameters.

oracle, dba, database administration, system administration, UNIX, Linux

Words cannot describe….. Just watch…… Seven minutes……

Via Don Burleson and Gizmodo

windows, microsoft, commercial, video, funny, rap, music

As I mentioned in in a my post about file security every file and directory in Linux has an owner and a group associated with it. The need commonly arises where the user or group ownership for files or directories needs to be changed. For example, if user the sally, in group finance is responsible for a number of files and Sally gets transferred to the purchasing group the ownership of the files might need to be changed to marge because Marge is the user who is taking Sally’s place in finance. The chown command is used to change file or directory ownership.

As another example if a number of files that are currently accessed by the test group are ready for production and need to be changed to the prod group, the chgrp command can be used to give access to the prod group.

Actually the chown command can be used to change both user and group ownership, while the chgrp command can only be used to change group ownership. This command will be covered later in this chapter. When using either chown or chgrp commands, the system will first check the permissions of the user issuing the commands to make certain they have sufficient permissions to make the change.

Now we’ll look at some examples of how to use the chown and chgrp commands. We’ll start with the chgrp command, then look at chown and then finally see how chown can be used to do the work of both!

Change Group Ownership

The chgrp command is used to change the group with which a file is associated. The first thing you will need to provide this command is the group which you want to change the file or directory to. After that you can list a single file or directory to be changed or list separate entities separated by spaces. The chgrp command will not have any affect on the access granted to the group (the rw- in the middle of the three permissions sets) but will change who can use those permissions.

Using the chgrp Command on a File

# ls -l
total 12
-rw-rw-r-- 1 tclark authors 2229 Jan 13 21:35 declaration.txt
-rw-rw-r-- 1 tclark authors 1310 Jan 13 17:48 gettysburg.txt
-rw-rw-r-- 1 tclark authors 360 Jan 13 17:48 preamble.txt
# chgrp presidents gettysburg.txt
# ls -l
total 12
-rw-rw-r-- 1 tclark authors 2229 Jan 13 21:35 declaration.txt
-rw-rw-r-- 1 tclark presidents 1310 Jan 13 17:48 gettysburg.txt
-rw-rw-r-- 1 tclark authors 360 Jan 13 17:48 preamble.txt

The chgrp command works the same for directories as it does for files. In the following example, the group ownership of the directory called examples will be changed. Directories are identified by the letter d in the first column of the ls –l display.

Using the chgrp Command on a Directory

# ls -l
total 4
-rw-rw-r-- 1 tclark tclark 0 Jan 13 21:13 example1.fil
-rw-rw-r-- 1 tclark tclark 0 Jan 13 21:13 example2.xxx
drwxrwxr-x 2 tclark tclark 4096 Jan 13 21:35 examples
# chgrp authors examples
# ls -l
total 4
-rw-rw-r-- 1 tclark tclark 0 Jan 13 21:13 example1.fil
-rw-rw-r-- 1 tclark tclark 0 Jan 13 21:13 example2.xxx
drwxrwxr-x 2 tclark authors 4096 Jan 13 21:35 examples

You can change the group for multiple files and/or directories by using the –R (recursive) option for the chgrp command. This is one of the few commands (we’ll see two of the others shortly) which use an upper-case R for the recursive option. When applied on a directory the –R option will apply the chgrp command to the directory and all its subdirectories and files. Care should be taken when using the –R option.

Next we’ll look at changing the ownership of files.

Change User Ownership

The chown (change owner) command can be used to change ownership of a file or directory. The syntax is very similar to chgrp.

# ls -l
total 12
-rw-rw-r-- 1 tclark authors 2229 Jan 13 21:35 declaration.txt
-rw-rw-r-- 1 tclark authors 1310 Jan 13 17:48 gettysburg.txt
-rw-rw-r-- 1 tclark authors 360 Jan 13 17:48 preamble.txt
# chown abe gettysburg.txt
# ls -l
total 12
-rw-rw-r-- 1 tclark authors 2229 Jan 13 21:35 declaration.txt
-rw-rw-r-- 1 abe authors 1310 Jan 13 17:48 gettysburg.txt
-rw-rw-r-- 1 tclark authors 360 Jan 13 17:48 preamble.txt

Just like with chgrp we see that chown accepts the username of the user who should get ownership and the file or directory to change. Again we could list multiple files or directories here with spaces separating them.

The chown command can be used to change the group ownership instead of the user ownership of a file or directory. If you wish to use chown to change the group ownership you can list a group preceded with either a colon (:) or a period (.). Here’s an example of how to use chown to change the group ownership of a file:

# ls -l
total 12
-rw-rw-r-- 1 tclark authors 2229 Jan 13 21:35 declaration.txt
-rw-rw-r-- 1 abe authors 1310 Jan 13 17:48 gettysburg.txt
-rw-rw-r-- 1 tclark authors 360 Jan 13 17:48 preamble.txt
# chown :presidents gettys*
# ls -l
total 12
-rw-rw-r-- 1 tclark authors 2229 Jan 13 21:35 declaration.txt
-rw-rw-r-- 1 abe presidents 1310 Jan 13 17:48 gettysburg.txt
-rw-rw-r-- 1 tclark authors 360 Jan 13 17:48 preamble.txt

If you wish to simultaneously change both the user and group ownership of a file you can specify the user and group in the format of user:group.

In the following example the user will be changed back to tclark and the group back to authors using a single command.

Using the chown Command to Change File Ownership

# ls -l
total 12
-rw-rw-r-- 1 tclark authors 2229 Jan 13 21:35 declaration.txt
-rw-rw-r-- 1 abe presidents 1310 Jan 13 17:48 gettysburg.txt
-rw-rw-r-- 1 tclark authors 360 Jan 13 17:48 preamble.txt
# chown tclark:authors gettys*
# ls -l
total 12
-rw-rw-r-- 1 tclark authors 2229 Jan 13 21:35 declaration.txt
-rw-rw-r-- 1 tclark authors 1310 Jan 13 17:48 gettysburg.txt
-rw-rw-r-- 1 tclark authors 360 Jan 13 17:48 preamble.txt

Here we see the user and group has been changed with a single command. Just like with chgrp the chown command will take the –R (recursive) option and apply the chown command to a directory and its subdirectories. This should be used with care.

Easy Linux CommandsFor more tips like this check out my book Easy Linux Commands, only $19.95 from Rampant TechPress.

Buy it now!


unix, linux, system administration, sysadmin, security, file security, permissions, owner, group

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