Triple barrel potato cannon

Well, this clearly qualifies for artillery of the week. This three barrel potato gun uses electronic injectors to deliver propane to each of its three champers, ignition coils and spark plugs for ignition, and the entire unit, including pan and tilt control is controlled through PIC micro controllers by a gaming joystick.

Triple barrel potato gun


The video has a ton of information on the device, but unfortunately only shows one shot, but if that’s not enough for you, you can make your own with the provided instructions*. I bet we’ll see more video of this potato gun sometime in the future.

* Check local laws regarding high velocity food products, and don’t blame me for the resulting accidents, lawsuits or potato famine.

via MAKE

make, diy, potato, food, potato gun, 3 barrel, atrillery, gun, project

Astroglide leak

Here’s a slippery situation I’m glad I’m not in… Don Burleson points out an article on Homeland Stupidity about a security breach from the Astroglide folks.

The major personal lubricant company accidentally exposed thousands of customers personal information on the company’s website, some of whom only signed up for a free sample. To compound the problem the data was cached on Google even after it was taken down from the Astroglide website.

While it would be easy to become desensitized to all these data breaches, but they’re a good reminder to take a look at security at all levels.

information technology, identity theft

Car Talk finally available as a podcast!

Car TalkAt long last Car Talk, the popular NPR show is available as a podcast.

This radio call-in show, hosted by “Click and Clack, the Tappet Brothers” takes calls from folks all around the country and even world. People call in with their car questions and the brothers, um, well, they give an answer. Sometimes several answers are given, and it seems like they usually get around to a useful answer, but I’m not yet convinced that it’s not accidental.

Either of the brothers alone would be hilarious, but together they’re ridiculous. The show features plenty of good-hearted ribbing, a weekly (typically off-topic) puzzler and probably half a dozen call-ins.

So if you’re looking for a way to waste a perfectly good hour (and some otherwise good bandwidth) and perhaps learn something about cars and mechanics, check out Car Talk. The show has been around for quite a while, but the podcast is the perfect way to enjoy it! I hope their sponsor, Allstate is paying them extra per-download because as a podcast the show could get very popular.

Armor made from CDs!

Here’s a unique use for all those AOL CDs: armor!

CD Armor


Tom over at Pixelated Images took this pic at Anime Central 2007. I love the fish-scale look of the CDs, especially on the swords and shields.

Unfortunately he didn’t get any additional info on it (creators, number/source of CDs etc.) but he did get pictures of several other equally extreme costumes.

anime, cd, art, fun, armor, fighting, swords

Easy Linux Commands: Book Review 3

Robert Vollman has now posted a review of my book Easy Linux Commands on Amazon.

He makes many good points but one I keep hearing from just about everyone is that almost all of the content of Easy Linux Commands can be applied on other UNIX and UNIX-like systems.

Here is Robert’s full review:

My shelf is full of technical books on a variety of topics, including Linux. But there have been times when someone new to the IT world will ask me for a book to get them started in a particular area. Alas, most of my books are thousand-page, exhaustively-detailed volumes that would be so inaccessible that the only use a beginner could get out of it would be to kill a few spiders.

But now, thanks to Jon Emmons and Terry Clark, I finally have a book I can give a young student, or a previously “Windows-only” PC user. “Easy Linux Commands” is just what it claims to be: an easy introduction to the command-line world.

Being easy to read and accessible is this book’s chief selling point. The book is not only under 200 pages, with lots of pictures, big text and barely 30 lines per page, but it’s also structured in the exact same familiar fashion as countless other books. Furthermore, I don’t find the author’s style overly technical. His writing style is very informal and almost conversational. Judge for yourself by visiting his blog “Life After Coffee,” where he occasionally includes excerpts from the book. In fact, if something is not clear, Jon Emmons is very accessible and answers questions quickly and happily.

http://www.lifeaftercoffee.com/

Also notice that I said this books introduces you to the command-line world, not Linux. I said that for two reasons:
1. Almost everything in this books applies equally well to Unix. Very little in this book is actually Linux-specific.
2. Even though Linux has graphical user interfaces, like Gnome and KDE, this book covers command-line Linux only.

One word of caution. Don’t be thrown by the “Become a Linux Command Guru” picture stamped on the front cover. You won’t be a guru. This covers the basics, and only a little more. But this book will get you past square one and allow you to use some of those big books for becoming a guru (instead of an exterminator).

Easy Linux CommandsCheck out my book Easy Linux Commands, only $19.95 from Rampant TechPress.

Buy it now!


linux, book