bridge_aug23As some I’m sure are aware, the bridge that links Holderness to Plymouth (NH) is being replaced. It’s been fairly cool watching the old bridge being taken down over the past month or so and I just wanted to share this with some of the folks who may not get up to Plymouth so much anymore.

The picture was taken earlier today from the temporary bridge. It was taken with a cell phone so the quality isn’t stellar, but you get the idea.

More pictures of the earlier part of the project are available at the University’s Phisical Plant site.

Technorati tags: , , , , , , ,

Originally written in 1990, the Optimal Flexible Architecture (OFA) whitepaper still stands as the best-practices for oracle databases. In my time as an Oracle database administrator I have often seen DBAs using these standards, having learned them from senior DBAs, who did not realize the OFA standard exists.

Cary V. Millsap of Oracle Corp. offers this description in this distribution of the whitepaper:

The OFA Standard is a set of configuration guidelines that will give you faster, more reliable Oracle databases that require less work to maintain. The OFA Standard is written by the founder of the Oracle team responsible for installing, tuning, and upgrading several hundreds of sites worldwide since 1990—this paper is based on the best practices of those hundreds of sites. Today the “Optimal Flexible Architecture’’ described in the OFA Standard is built into the Oracle configuration tools and documentation on all open systems ports.

The benifits of the OFA standard go beyond performance and stability. When I started at Plymouth State University 18 months ago I quickly recognized the signs of an OFA environment (mostly partitions named /u01 and /u02.) Having identified that, I immediately knew where to find nearly all data and configuration files.

The guidelines that OFA provides can be easily adapted to other modern multi-user applications including web servers, application servers and other breeds of database. I offer the OFA whitepaper here as I have found it increasingly difficult to find on the web.

The OFA Standard-Oracle for Open Systems

oracle, sql, dba, database administration, database development, database security, database, oracle security

Google is a great (arguably the best) resource for keyword searching on the internet, but many folks don’t realize what else Google is capable of.

Here is a short list of things I use Google for, beyond just searching.

Track packages – Enter a package tracking number for any carrier (I’ve tried UPS, FedEX and USPS) and Google will give you a link to track the package. It’s usually easier and quicker than using the carrier’s page.

Movie show times – Type “movie:” and your zip code or city/state and get a listing of local movie theatres, movies and show times.

Phone number to name and address – Type in a listed phone number and get a name and address of the owner of the number. This is great for finding the address of businesses.

Get a map for a city – Type in a US zip code or city, state and get a link to the map for that zip code.

Define a word – Type “define: ” in the search box followed by a word you want defined and get a definition of that word.

Do math – Google is capable of most mathematic functions. Just type the math you want to do right in the search box and hit search. The result will be at the top of the list. You could write a chapter on just this feature, but most of the functions are defined on this help page.

Convert to and from roman numerals – Enter a search like “28 in roman numerals” or “MCMLXVI in decimal” and get a quick conversion. You will need to put the roman numeral in all capial letters.

Measurement unit converter – Convert measurements of anything from cooking ingredients to rotational force just by typing a search like “2 cups in tablespoons”

Currency converter – Similar to the measurement converter, just type something like “32 US Dollars in British Pounds” and get a quick currency conversion.

So you can see that Google wants to be much more to us than just a search engine. Learn more on this Google help page or try some of the tricks through the search box below. Enjoy!



Google

Technorati tags: , , , , ,

Below are some of my favorite Oracle related web resources. Most have information on databases and Oracle Application Server. There are, of course, countless sites out there on the topic. These are just a few of the ones I prefer.

tahiti.oracle.com – This quick URL gives you direct access to the current Oracle documentation (with a free OTN account.) It’s a good quick back-door way into the oracle docs.

asktom.oracle.com – I don’t know the whole story on this guy, but he seems to work for (or closely with) Oracle answering user submitted questions. There are thousands of questions and answers on all things Oracle.

otn.oracle.com – Oracle’s Technology Network is the official source for tech news from Oracle. It is to the techies what www.oracle.com is to the business folks.

orafaq.com – More Oracle question and answer listings. Also a very useful and comprehensive glossary.

rittman.net – Mark Rittman’s Oracle Weblog is a fantastic resource with a focus on data warehousing and business intelligence. One of the best sites by an individual.

Technorati tags: , , , ,

A MUST HAVE for fellow tinkerers, hacks and geeks!

Friday afternoon I was chatting with a coleague when I saw this magazine on his desk:

Make Voluem 1

Immediately intrigued by the image of a kite tied to a title that read “Aerial Photography Now With Kites!” and additionally drawn in by such cover stories as “Backyard Monorails” and “iPod Tricks” I asked if I could borrow the magazine.

Upon closer examination I noticed the magazine is published by O’Reilly. How could that be a bad thing? Naively believing this would be a magazine I would read only a few articles from I promised the coworker I would return it to him on Monday.

That night I started flipping through the mag and looking at the articles. After going randomly to three or four I realized I was going to read every article in this magazine (those of you who know me will understand how sinificant that is.)

Full of intriguing articles such as “Desktop Rail Gun” and “XM Radio Hacks” this premiere volume of MAKE shows a lot of promise. If you, like I, have a need to know how things work and like a glimpse into cool things going on out there (such as the “Fab Lab” at MIT) then you need this magazine!!!

Well, I’m going to go back to reading about “The Open Source Car” but you can expect to hear more about MAKE from me in the future. For now, they currently have three volumes out which can be purchased individually through Amazon (also through the MAKE website, but cheaper through Amazon.) You can also subscribe through Amazon or MAKE’s website.

Here are some links to get you started:

MAKE: Magazine at MakeZine.com

From Amazon:

Volume 1: Premiere
Volume 2: Home Entertainment
Volume 3: Cars and Halloween
Subscription to MAKE

Technorati tags: , , , ,

« Previous PageNext Page »