A few weeks ago I mentioned my disappointment that Apple had appealed the settlement of the class action suit for iPod owners whose batteries did not live up to initial claims. While I am still disappointed with Apple for appealing the settlement I am quite happy to say the appeal has been dismissed.

When I checked the settlement administration website today I found this message:

Update December 22, 2005

On December 20, 2005, the appeal filed by individual objectors to the Settlement was dismissed and the Settlement is now Final. This means Apple and the Settlement Administrator can move forward with claims administration and claims fulfillment.

Deadlines relating to claim submissions have not changed. Class members should comply with the claim filing deadlines identified by the Settlement. For Generation 3 iPods, the claim form submission must be postmarked within two years of the original product purchase date. The deadline for submitting Generation 1 and Generation 2 iPod claims expired on 9/30/05.

While it’s still a little unclear how Apple will go about replacing the defective batteries I am glad to see we’re back on track to get this suit settled.

apple,ipod,battery,ipod settlement, ipod nano, ipod shuffle, ipod battery, macintosh

Holiday Decorations SpecWhen decorating this year make sure you meet all standards and regulations! This is a key factor in reducing friction with in-laws and maximizing holiday cheer.

Thankfully, the folks at Winzler & Kelly have graciously provided this detailed PDF on how to accurately arrange and decorate for the holidays. Proper runway specifications appropriate for sleigh landings are also included.

Thanks to Tom for sending this to me.


christmas, xmas, decorations, holiday, holiday decorating

Relay Kit CompleteSo Alan has made some good progress on the Bar Monkey. The relays are mostly complete (a few nights soldering between grading finals) and the next step is testing them out.

According to Alan the relays were fairly straight forward. The only big challenge was figuring out the orientation of the IC chips. Thankfully they mount in sockets so it’s fairly easy to switch them around.

Check out my Bar Monkey Gallery for some pictures of the relay in various states of assembly.

Check back often for updates on the project!

drinks, cocktails, alcohol, bar, bar monkey, electronics, drink, cocktail, alan baker

As I am looking into a couple electronics projects I have turned up a handful of fantastic resources on the web. Here they are in no particular order.

Suppliers:

    Jameco – Broad selection of electronic supplies. Good service, includes pictures, great prices. These guys are my current favorite.
    Digi-Key – Has some stuff Jameco doesn’t. Prices are a bit higher in general, but good service. No pictures. Poorly organized site.

Reference:

    The Hardware Book – A great reference for cable and adapter pinouts. Some common, most hard to find.

Projects:

    Play-Hookey – Fantastic, step-by-step instructions on a logical series of electronics experiments. Includes great information and instructionals on logic, electricity, analog circuits, and even optics. This site is definitely a great starting point!
    Bowden’s Hobby Circuit – A wide variety of projects. Great schematics, nice explainations, but not much for step-by-step.

electric, electronic, circuit, electronic suppliers, electronic projects, schematics

Alan Baker, a good friend and co-worker has decided that it’s time to build a Bar Monkey.

What’s a Bar Monkey? Well the idea comes from the guys at BarMonkey.net. Basically the idea is to have some computer controlled hardware (relays and pumps or valves) that pour precisely measured amounts of liquors and mixers to make your favorite drinks.

Among all the different variations on the Bar Monkey there are really two ways to deliver the mixers from bottle to glass. The first is to use pumps to carry the liquid. The major problem with this is that food-grade pumps are very expensive ($50 and up). Others have used cheaper windshield wiper fluid pumps but Alan and I were concerned about the safety of the materials used being in direct contact with consumables.

That led us to the other option which involves pressurizing the line (either with compressed gas or gravity) and using shut off valves from a refrigerator to control flow. Alan has chosen to pressurize with CO2. Originally we were going to use a CO2 canister from a paint ball gun. The small size and low price of these is ideal, however we are having trouble finding proper threaded fittings.

Flow control will be accomplished with refrigerator ice maker valves. Alan found these valves for $15/each at WaterFilterMart.com however they seem to have gone up to $22 almost immediately after Alan bought them.

The brains of this operation are the Kit 108 Serial Relay Kit from ElectronicKits.com. Each kit can control 8 relays capable of running the shut-off valves. The kits are connected by the serial module upgrade kit which allows you to join two of the controllers together to control 16 valves.

So the purchasing phase is nearly done and we hope to start assembly soon. Click here to view the complete shopping list and check back frequently for updates on our progress!

drinks, cocktails, alcohol, bar, bar monkey, electronics, drink, cocktail, alan baker

« Previous PageNext Page »