Caffeine ThemeIt’s only been a few weeks since the release of the Caffeine WordPress theme and I’m thrilled to see some people have adopted it.

It seems Headphone News and DIYmoz have adopted the theme and made it their own. Check them out. It’s amazing the difference a new header graphic can make!



wordpress, wordpress theme, theme, blog, blogging

Caffeine ThemeWell, it’s been a lot of work, but I have now released my WordPress theme Caffeine. Read all about it on the Caffeine Theme Homepage.

If you like the looks of it, go ahead and grab it. If you’re looking for a theme to modify you may find it interesting. I did my best to make the code readable and I encourage folks to make it their own.

If you decide to use Caffeine I’d love to hear from you via email or comment. Make sure to leave a URL. If you find any problems please leave them as comments as well and I’ll do my best to fix it for the next version.

Enjoy, and happy blogging!

wordpress, blog, blogging, blogs, theme, theme development

Donald Burleson of Burleson Consulting points out some interesting statistics from Tim O’Reilly on trends in the tech book market.

If we assume that people are buying books because of a market demand, we see Oracle is steep decline and SQL Server book sales up 83%, followed closely by PostgreSQL. We saw this exact same trend in 1992-1995 when Oracle books started to dominate the database book market, displacing DB2 and IDMS/R books.

As a whole, the big news is that database book sales are way-down with the exception of PostgreSQL and SQL Server books, which are up 83% and are now double the size of the Oracle market.

Check out Donald Burleson’s full article

Some of this shift may be due to the recent release of Microsoft SQL Server 2005. Dispite it’s small overall percentage, the growth in PostgreSQL book sales is significant enough to keep an eye on it in the near future.

Also interesting is the stagnation of the MySQL book sales, down 2% from last year. With the number of blogs, wikis and other relatively hot technologies running on MySQL I’m surprised this number is down.

In contrast to the book sales, Alexa, which measures a number of statistics to determine rank among web pages, shows increased web ranking for Oracle, MySQL and PostgreSQL, while showing decreased traffic to Microsoft’s corporate site.

Graph by Alexaholic.com

For the full scoop according to Tim O’Reilly, check out his articles State of the Computer Book Market, Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3.

books, book, tech books, technology, computers, database, dba, database administration, publishing, oracle

Life After Coffee – 26% Wider and Now With Caffeine

After many hours playing with my site theme I have finally made the leap. Unless something has gone horribly wrong (or you’re reading this in an RSS reader) you’re now looking at Caffeine, my new WordPress theme.

I’m no web developer, so this is a fairly big departure for me. If you have any suggestions, or if you find any browser issues or other bugs, please feel free to leave a comment on this post or contact me through the contact link above.

This theme is based on the default WordPress theme, but is also inspired by the popular Connections theme. Once I’ve had a bit more time to touch up the code I’ll probably be making this theme available for download.

I’m interested in distributing the theme not because I think everyone wants their site to look like mine, but rather because I’ve spent a ton of time making the theme easy to modify. Hours were spent indenting code, adding comments, organizing the css and replacing the archaic endif and enwhile markers in the code.

The result is what you see here. The whole theme only uses four images so it should be easy to change up the entire look of it fairly easily. Everything that’s opened in the header.php is closed in the footer.php and all the sidebar stuff is in the sidebar.php. I’ve also been able to add a (very usefull) admin panel in the sidebar.

As I said above, I’m no web developer. As such I have to give great thanks to Matt Batchelder and Zach Tirrell (who are web developers) for helping me with my theme redo.

Please leave any suggestions or problems and check back often if you’re interested in the Caffeine theme.

blogs, wordpress, theme

A recent comment on my story about converting UNIX timestamps to Oracle dates prompted me to do a little extra digging on UNIX time.

UNIX time is a standard system used not only in UNIX but in many other modern computer systems. Instead of being divided into years, months, hours, minutes, etc. UNIX time is simply a number which represents the number of seconds which have passed since midnight Coordinated Universal time (UTC, the same time zone as Greenwich Mean Time, sometimes referred to as Zulu time), January 1, 1970. This date is often referred to as the UNIX epoch.

Sound like a lot of seconds? It is. At the time of this writing it has been 1,145,404,660 since the UNIX epoch, but since people like to think of dates the old fashioned way, in years, months, days, hours, minutes and seconds the computer is almost always nice enough to convert the UNIX time into the familiar date and time format, and to your local time zone.

One of the strengths of UNIX time is that when it is recorded (a point in UNIX time is typically referred to as a UNIX timestamp) it is always relative to Greenwich Mean Time. That means UNIX timestamps can be easily converted to different time zones with no ambiguity.

For all the gruesome details on UNIX time, Wikipedia has a typically thorough article on the topic.

While there are several sites on the web to convert a UNIX timestamp to human readable format and vice-verse be careful. Many sites will do the conversion based on their time zone. 4WebHelp.net provides a great page for converting both ways.

In contrast to UNIX time, Oracle Databases record time in a more traditional year, month, day, hour, minute, second manner. In order to convert Oracle dates to a different time zone you need to know what time zone the date was originally recorded in. Only recently has Oracle introduced a time datatype with a time zone attribute.

unix, time, timestamp, time zone, date, oracle, database, solaris, linux

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