Well, for those of you who actually follow this blog you may be wondering why I haven’t been posting as many stories lately. Here are the top reasons:

  1. There have been lots of comments here lately and I still try to respond to them all
  2. I’ve been playing Brain Age Sudoku on the Nintendo DS
  3. I found the best beer store in Concord, NH (USA)
  4. The air conditioner broke at work and I just don’t have the brain power left after a day in 90 degree heat
  5. I picked the wrong day to stop sniffing glue

So if you’ll bear with me, I’m doing my best to cool down, sober up, and break my Sudoku habit. Believe me, all three are tough, and in truth the only one I’m really trying to do is cool down.

Bear with me and stay tuned for more things that occasionally roll around in my head.

Jon

Two interesting articles about bad habits some bloggers seem to have. Of course me, I just post an article without finishing my sentences.

Andy C points out 7 habits of highly ineffectual bloggers including (automatically) playing music, crazy Flash animation (let’s face it folks, Flash animation is just animated GIFs grown up) and pleading for comments.

Rod Boothby of Innovation Creators points out an interesting survey asking What’s the Biggest Lie About Blogging? The most interesting response, as Rod points out, comes from Seth Godin:

Oh for sure, it’s this: That people care what you say. They don’t. They care what they get.

I think both articles bring up good points for aspiring bloggers. Don’t think they’re right? Take a look at the most popular stories and the most popular blogs. Do what you want with your blog, but both these posts point out some of the pitfalls best avoided, or at least used sparingly if you’re trying to build traffic to a blog.

blog, blogging

CaffeineI’m thrilled to see more folks adopting the Caffeine WordPress Theme! Here are a couple more sites currently running Caffeine.

Coffee Klatch

Burnt Coffee Chatter

An Englishman In America – with a nice modified header.

Tim’s Big Adventure

Rico’s Jazz Fest Blog 2006 – also with a nice new header.

A Crafty Madness



wordpress, wordpress theme, theme, blog, blogging

The group I work and socialize with frequently talk about how our blogs reflect our professional experience. Judging by this recent post from Rod Boothby we’re clearly not the only ones thinking about this:

Career 2.0 is probably going to be much the same as Career 1.0; except, now, the bar is higher. Running your own blog, and making a public name for yourself is part of achieving those new heights.

Rod refers to Career 2.0 while I’ve been referring to Resume 2.0, but the ideas are the same. Your blog (if you have one) is part of your professional image. If you write about important topics in your field, share your experience and resources, and perhaps a bit about your personality you will be more appealing to employers than those who just have a two page paper resume.

Think about it. If you haven’t been on a hiring committee, get on one. It’s a good experience. You’ll notice that everyone wants to know more about the candidates: What are their interests? How deep is their experience? How do they communicate? The more of these questions you can answer before the interview process the better.

resume, resume 2.0, career, blog, hiring

GoogleAfter a catastrophic disk failure a long-time blogger was faced with complete data loss.

“I had the database backed up into a separate directory, but unfortunately it was on the same disk as the live one, so when that disk died I lost everything” the blog administrator sheepishly admitted. “I wasn’t sure what I could do. Professional data recovery is costly and not guaranteed, and the thought of starting again from scratch after having hundreds of stories was daunting. Then it struck me… Google has all my data!”

OK, so this never really happened, but why couldn’t it? Of course you’d have to manually copy and paste all your content, but if you were trying to recover from complete data loss on a public-facing web server you could conceivably recover all your text, with markup, from Google’s cache.

Go ahead and try it. Go to Google and search for your site. Right now the search “site:www.lifeaftercoffee.com” returns 376 results (or actually ‘376 Wesuwts’ since I changed my language to Elmer Fudd) and from those cached pages I was easily able to find most of my content.

Remember to backup often and to a secure location separate from where your server is, but if you’re ever trying to get a page or site back from the dead, Google may just save your bacon.

google, disaster recovery, blogs, internet, information technology

« Previous PageNext Page »