Leo Laporte reported today that there would be no TWiT (This Week in Tech) podcast for the next couple weeks and he’s not sure what the future of the show will be:

I’ll decide what happens to TWiT, the show, when I come back, but at this point it looks like it’s on life support and the heart monitor is flatlining.

Leo already has over 100 comments on the story which is only a few hours old. While I don’t envy him the hours he’ll likely spend reading the comments, I love the show so much I had to add my two cents worth:

Leo,

I know how exhausting it can be to keep pouring your heart into something while others treat it as a hobby.

But, that’s what it is to some. I learned a long time ago, while managing student workers, that it’s important to remember what a job, project, podcast (or is that netcast) means to the others involved, not just what it means to you.

It sounds like you still want to do TWiT, and the tech news isn’t going to stop coming. Consider how you could re-engage some of the other twits. Is there a better time for others? Would a shorter format be easier? Are there topics they want to cover that you don’t normally hit on?

As much as I’m a big fan of the current TWiT regulars there are plenty of people out there with opinions. Perhaps you need a larger pool of regulars. When I want to play poker I always invite twice as many people as I want to have play knowing half will cancel for some (completely valid) reason or another.

Is it a TWiT without Patrick and John? I think so. Maybe just a different TWiT. You’ve got an established name, a big audience and even a sponsor. Why start something completely new when you’ve got these things going for you?

But, on a completely selfish level, please, please, please, please, PLEASE don’t stop making TWiT, and thank you and all the other twits for making so many great episodes.

Jon

technology, computer, news, information technology

Alexander over at PositiveSharing.com has posted his Top 10 tips for productive, creative, fun writing.

So how’d [write a whole book in twenty days]? Well the answer is obvious isn’t it? Clear goals, hard work, perseverance, sticking to it, eliminating distractions and writing no matter what, right?

Wrong.

Wrong, wrong, wrong. I tried that. Didn’t work. So I tried the exact opposite and that worked.

Like most of Alexander’s posts, this list is both highly applicable and refreshingly unconventional. Some of these things I find I’ve already been doing and others I’ll have to remember to try.

While my publisher would probably take issue with #9 (No deadlines or goals) I’m sure these tips will find their way into how I blog and work on my books.

writing, blogging

Think this blog thing is a fad? Think again! With Technorati now tracking over 50 million blogs (as of July ’06), a number which has been doubling every six months for the past three years.

What does this mean? Well, it means there’s some momentum behind blogs that shows no sign of plateauing anytime soon.

Rod Boothby at great thoughts on the matter…

With blogging growing that fast, it is inevitable that blogs will become a major part of enterprise communications in the near future. CTOs, CIOs and CKOs that fight that trend will find their people turning to open, external providers. That might not be a bad thing, but the more cautious route would probably be to provide a company sanctioned secure alternative.

Check out Rod’s full article. I think he’s got a pretty good pulse on this.

blogs, blogging, blog, blogosphere

Happy Birthday LAC!Today is one year from when I posted my very first post here on Life After Coffee. A lot has happened in the past year, much more than I ever anticipated! Here are some highlights:

Here are the five most popular stories from the past year:

  1. My Cubicle – Song Lyrics
  2. The Straight Poop on Kopi Luwak Coffee
  3. Oracle, SQL, Dates and Timestamps
  4. Performing Math on Oracle Dates
  5. How to Create Auto Increment Columns in Oracle

But some of my favorite stories don’t rank in the top 5. Here’s a few of my favorite stories from year 1:

So thanks to everyone for reading! I’m thrilled to have helped a few folks find the answers they were looking for. I’m glad you’ve enjoyed my rants and ramblings and believe me, there’s more to come.

Jon

Donald Burleson has an interesting article about determining the credibility of web resources.

This has been a big topic here at Plymouth State University since I was a student, and after a good discussion with Donald I have written up how I evaluate the credibility of web resources.

Consider whether the information makes sense. Chances are you’re reading about a topic you know a bit about. Does this information fit with what you have experienced? Of course what you know might be wrong, but at least you know it from your own experience. If you don’t know anything about the topic you’re researching, stop now. Go find someone who does and have them point you at some good resources.

If you’re looking for factual information you can probably find it on several sites. Do most sites seem to agree on this topic? If so that tends to lend to the credibility. If not you may be on a very opinion-driven topic which has no right or wrong answer.

What is the reputation of the site in question from other, possibly more reputable sites? For instance, Cliff wrote some instructions on Solaris partitioning which were linked by Sun support shortly after that. A link like that gives a high level of confidence in the content presented.

Anonymous and virtually anonymous resources like message boards, wikis, and newsgroups should not be assumed as correct. Misinformation, whether intentional or not, is common in these resources and, while Wikipedia is a great place to look up episodes of your favorite TV show it should not be used as a primary resource. These sites should be considered supporting resources at best.

These rules have not steered me wrong yet. Everyone has their own methods and needs to figure out their own level of risk, but this has suited me well.

web resources, web credibility, research

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