National Weather Service LogoIn my previous post Better Weather Forecast I encouraged folks to try out the National Weather Service website for local forecasts without the irritating ads that The Weather Channel seems to run.

Well, one of my primary gripes about the National Weather Service has always been their obscure domain name, nws.noaa.gov, was always a bit tough to remember, and it made it tough to spread the word too.

They seem to have gotten around to updating some links non their site and I noticed that many of their links now go to weather.gov! This makes things much easier!

So either I’ve been missing it this whole time, or they’ve decided to start using this domain. Either way, check out weather.gov for your local forecast national coverage, and even hurricane information! It’s still better than weather.com, and now it’s easier to remember!

weather, weather forecast, forecast, local weather, hurricane

NOAA image of Grand Isle, La., taken on Aug. 31, 2005, two days after Hurricane Katrina struck the U.S. Gulf Coast.The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has posted many of their aerial images on their site.

In this article they outline much of what NOAA has been up to durring the cleanup process. It is interesting to see how involved they are, especially considering how little you hear about them. Don’t miss out on the “higher resolution version” links. They’re incredible!

Click here to view the full article from NOAA.
katrina, hurricane katrina, aerial photos, aerial images, weather, hurricane, louisiana, new orleans, storms

Make: Vol 2In the gaps between teaching, work, bloging and working on some pet-projects I have finally finished MAKE: Technology On Your Time, Volume 2. Chock full of home entertainment projects, I am yet again impressed with the quality and quantity.

Highlights include HDTV on Your Mac, Atari 2600PC, and instructions on how to build a twitchy little robot out of a computer mouse. I’m glad the magazine only comes out quarterly… I could spend three months working on the projects from just one issue!

While the quality of the projects outlined in MAKE is undeniable, I am finding the true value of the magazine is how it has changed the way I look at things. I can only equate this to when I learned how to pick locks. Once you have picked a Masterlock and a few door locks your attitude toward locked doors changes. What was once a barrier is now a challenge, even one to look forward to.

MAKE has changed the way I view the world. A broken answering machine, old mouse, dead entertainment system, even a cheap Commadore64 direct-to-TV game have taken on a new value. I’ve always been a hacker, never afraid to take the screws out and rewire, but this is going to a whole new level!

More than a book full of projects, MAKE is full of new ways to apply technology, new tools, and true “maker” attitude. The value of MAKE, and it’s true spirit, is realized when you view it not as a bunch of projects and reviews, but as 200 pages of raw information just waiting to see how the reader will put it all together.

Will I build a Lego robot controlled by an audio chip? Podcast a lecture for a class I will be teaching? Perhaps build a desktop linear accelerator to annoy and harm my cube-mates! (just kidding)

Well, one thing is for sure… I’m glad my girlfriend got me a subscription for my birthday. Time to dig into Volume 3. I’m afraid I’ve only got a couple months until Volume 4 will arrive.

For more information on what started this new obsession of mine, check out this article about MAKE, and this retrospective on Volume 1.

make, oreilly, make magazine, hacks, hack, hacker, electronics, electronic, entertainment, technology, electric, home entertainment, diy, do it yourself,

Thanks to w3schools.com for making the internet available for download.

If you’re tired of the internet, borkweb.com has provided this script to delete the internet.

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With a fairly long commute (45 miles each way) and gas above $3 per gallon I have been doing a little homework on telecommuting, also known as telework.

The Office of Personnel Management and the General Services Administration have some extensive telework resources for federal employees. The site www.telework.gov is full of great information including resources for identifying good candidates for telework, maintaining a good working environment when some employees telework and others do not, and evaluating the performance of teleworkers.

More pertinent to higher education, the University of Minnesota has much of their telecommuting policies and agreements available online at this page including a supervisor’s toolkit for implementing telecommuting. They outline the following potential benefits of telecommuting:

Society:
• Supports the Clean Air Act/Reduces air pollution
• Reduces traffic congestion, fuel consumption
• Supports the Americans with Disabilities Act
• Provides more job opportunities for the disabled, part-time, and semi-retired
University Units:
• Enhances employee productivity and work quality
• Increases long-term recruiting, retention, and loyalty of employees
• Improves employee morale and job satisfaction
• Increases workforce diversity by widening of labor pool
• Reduces overhead costs, especially in capital investments
• Reduces employee sick leave and absenteeism
• Enhances employer image in partnership with 21st century
• Enables employees to work during weather emergencies
Employee:
• Enhances job productivity and work quality
• Improves morale and job satisfaction
• Provides greater degree of responsibility
• Provides greater lifestyle flexibility in meeting family and job needs
• Reduces commuting time and stress
• Reduces transportation costs
• Provides satisfaction from greater employer trust

Of course there are more resources out there, but I believe these two are a good starting point for any employer or employee.

While my institution does not recognize telecommuting, well, let’s just say I’ve still been doing a lot of thinking about it. Hey, it’s better than looking for another job…

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