MasterWish.com Year Two

MasterWishLast year I was proud to introduce MasterWish.com, a website which allows users to build wish lists of things they want not just from one site, but from any site on the web or even off the web. Matt Batchelder, Zach Tirrell and I started working on this project over a year ago now and we’ve learned a lot in that time, but rather than look back I like to look forward to the year to come.

Here are a few things we are hoping to pay some attention to in the upcoming year to make MasterWish even more useful to you:

  • Shared wish lists for weddings, anniversaries, etc.
  • Interface improvements for greater consistency between pages
  • Improvements to the bookmarklet
  • More currencies

As in the past year, user feedback will continue to guide our development efforts so use it, love it, and let us know what we can do to make you love it even more!

Don’t have a MasterWish Account yet? Sign up now! It’s free, easy and fun!

masterwish, wish list, wishlist, online shopping, shopping, wedding registry, registry

DNS Report

After having some DNS problems of his own, Casey over at MaisonBisson.com points out a great DNS examination tool.

DNSReport.com is nice tool for verifying your sites DNS records. It’s nothing fancy, but similar to Internet Traffic Report could be indispensable for troubleshooting website problems.

dns, internet, network, network administration, troubleshooting, networking

W3Schools.com WTF?

Inspired by the Oracle WTF blog I have my own WTF today.

www.w3schools.com has some outstanding tutorials on HTML, CSS, SQL, PHP, and many many more. So why does such a tech savvy site require that you type www before it’s domain name to get to their server?

Go ahead, try going to http://w3schools.com. Depending on your browser the error may vary, but you sure won’t get a site.

Now for those of you who are unfamiliar with DNS and domain name resolution, trust me, it would just take one additional line in their domain resolution table to make it work both ways. Really W3Schools… WTF?

Update: W3Schools has now set up a redirect for http://w3schools.com. Not sure if this story had anything to do with it, but thanks!

wtf, programming, website, dns

Bill and Tim’s Excellent Adventure

Or…

Geek 2.0 meets Geek 1.0

If you’ve been following the “Web 2.0” conversations, are interested in the future of web technology, or just have a half hour or so to kill, you should check out this video of Tim O’Reilly and Bill Gates. In the video from Mix 06 O’Reilly leads off by drawing a paralell between Web 2.0 and Microsoft’s Live Software, a parallel which I’m afraid Gates didn’t (or didn’t want to) understand.

Common Web 2.0 topics came up, like perpetual beta, user added value, RSS, etc. Not surprisingly Gates was clearly uncomfortable with the topics. For example, when O’Reilly brought up the topic of perpetual beta, Gates went to his comfort zone and talked about how Microsoft’s plan to upgrade IE as often as three times per year was cutting edge. Similarly when O’Reilly mentioned the mashup of craig’s list and Google Maps as part of the evolution of the web as a platform rather than continue on that topic, Gates shapes his response into a description of the products Microsoft is developing to compete with Google Maps.

Through the whole presentation it becomes increasingly clear that Gates is only comfortable speaking about his own company’s technology while O’Reilly is talking about the direction of the industry. This is why I say Geek 2.0 meets Geek 1.0. Geek 2.0 (O’Reilly) speaks in terms like standards, technologies, trends, platforms. Geek 1.0 (Gates) speaks in terms like program x, technology b, product t. Geek 1.0 thinks their software vendor should and will innovate within their field, while geek 2.0 reaches out to open-source products and custom mashups and software which will evolve with usage.

Watch the body language in this video. O’Reilly looks like he could be sitting in his living room talking to someone. Gates looks like he’s on trial. Pretty bad since the Mix conference was hosted by Microsoft.

Check out the video here.

Thanks to Ken for pointing this out last week.

microsoft, oreilly, o’reilly, web 2.0, web20, web office, software, software development

A Social Adoption Strategy for your Social Software

Innovation Creators posted an article earlier this week Start blogging…. or you’re FIRED!. Rod Boothby, the author of Innovation Creators has some similar reading on encouraging enterprise blogging by playing to your employee’s egos and Web Office technology in general but in this article he points out an excellent adoption strategy for social software in enterprise.

In her article An adoption strategy for social software in enterprise consultant Suw Charman outlines a clear strategy for fostering, rather than dictating adoption of social software (specifically blogs and wikis) in enterprise. Many of these techniques are familiar, especially in higher-ed, but this strategy puts all the aspects together.

The strategy is very bottom-up, grassroots, user, and use driven, just like the software which it is meant to be applied to; but what makes this strategy complete is it also outlines what leaders and managers should do to support the user-driven efforts.

blog,weblog, enterprise blog, project management, web20