Here’s a quick way to find out what hardware is installed in your Solaris system, including RAM, CPUs, PCI cards, and external devices. The output will usually include the size of each memory chip in the system.

The one trick to using this command is to make sure you use the backtick instead of a single quote around the uname -i. The backtick is typically shift tilde and forces the command between the backticks to be executed and substituted in to that part of the command.

/usr/platform/`uname -i`/sbin/prtdiag

prtdiag actually displays system diagnostic information. I’ve used this on Solaris 7 through 10. The best parts is you do not even need to be root to execute this.

For more info on prtdiag check out the man page.

solaris, sun, unix, system administration, sysadmin

It looks like Oracle is re-aligning themselves with Sun Solaris as their preferred 64-bit platform. In the March issue of Oracle Magazine they have a short announcement on the topic:

Oracle has chosen the Solaris 10, Sun Microsystems’ multiplatform, open source operating system, as its preferred development and deployment platform for most 64-bit architectures. Solaris 10 will be used throughout Oracle’s development organization, and Oracle will release and ship 64-bit versions of all Oracle products on Solaris prior to, or simultaneously with, release on other operating systems.

Check out the whole article here or sign up to get your free copy of Oracle Magazine.

Thanks to Jon G. for sending this on to me.

oracle, database, database administration, dba, systems administration, sysadmin, solaris, sun, sun microsystems, UNIX, open source, 64-bit

EditPlus in actionWhile there are many text editors out there offering a broad set of features my favorite right now is EditPlus.

EditPlus is a Windows shareware application designed for text, HTML, Java, PHP, etc. It’s very thin requiring little (nearly no) load time and has many great features such as:

  • Syntax hilighting for many languages
  • EditPlus on Windows right-click
  • FTP and SFTP integration
  • Templates
  • Line Numbering
  • Column Selection
  • Optional Spell Checker

The list of features is long and every revision brings more. Check out the Features page for more.

I’ve been using the Oracle 9iR2 syntax file from the user files section of EditPlus.com and it seems to pick up all the SQL and PL/SQL syntax I use, although many other syntax files exist and you could always make your own.

As mentioned above, EditPlus is shareware. A single user license is only $30, and with discounts for buying in bulk there is no reason not to pay, but for now, download it, try it, and see why you can’t live without it.

Thanks to Zach for showing this to me a couple years ago.

text, text editing, editing, editor, edit, sql, plsql, pl/sql, sftp, ftp, notepad, wordpad, oracle, unix, php, perl, programming, database programming, dba, database administration, systems administration, c, c++, java, javascript, css, html

OracleIf you’re running an Oracle Application Server 10g instance you are probably familiar with Oracle Enterprise Manager Application Server Control. If not, go back to the manual. This is not a how-to on setting it up or using it. If you want to know how to secure it and refresh the certificate when it expires, read on.

Application Server Control is installed with Application Server 10g and typically runs on a port like 1810. By default it uses the non-secure http protocol. Since your whole application server is controlled through this interface, you probably want to secure it. The instructions below will generate a self signed certificate and get your Application Server Control up and running with https.

As usual this post is written for Oracle Application Server 10g on UNIX. Always review the documentation for your release before trying any of these steps.

Securing Application Server Control

Oracle has provided a simple way to secure Application Server Control.

Note: If $ORACLE_HOME/bin is not in your path you will need to provide this path to emctl.

1. Connect to the command line on the application server and set all the appropriate environment variables for your application instance.

2. Run the command emctl stop iasconsole to stop Application Server Control.

3. Run the command emctl secure em to secure Application Server control. This will perform a few steps including generating a self-signed secure certificate.

4. Run emctl start iasconsole to start Application Server Control.

If all goes well you will now be able to connect to your Application Server Control instance on the same port as before but now with the https protocol. In most browsers you will need to specify ‘https://’ in the URL.

Depending on your browser settings you may get a warning when accessing the site that the secure certificate was not issued by a trusted company. That is normal with a self-signed certificate. You can either tell your browser to trust the certificate or simply disregard the warning when it appears.

Renewing the Certificate

By default the certificate created in the steps above will only be good for six months. Once the cert goes stale you will probably get a warning that the certificate date is invalid. You may additionally get some java errors like below.

When this happens you can simply re-secure Application Server Control with the same steps above. This will create a new certificate which will be valid for another six months.

Some Potential Problems

If the certificate has expired you will likely get a java error like this:

IOException in sending Request :: javax.net.ssl.SSLException: SSL handshake failed: X509CertExpiredErr

If this happens simply re-secure Application Server Control with the instructions above.

Sometimes Application Server Control will not shut down properly and you may get an error like this:

IOException in sending Request :: javax.net.ssl.SSLException: SSL handshake failed: SSLIOClosedOverrideGoodbyeKiss

If this happens you will probably have to kill the enterprise manager process (look for a process called emagent) and re-secure again.

oracle, oracle application server, oracle security

Internet Traffic ReportImagine having a quick-and-dirty overview of network health on a worldwide basis. That’s exactly what the Internet Traffic Report offers.

When working at WebCT I frequently used this site to help diagnose why University A in City B could not reach our servers while other people could. Now as Plymouth State University starts reaching a wider audience, both nationally and globally, I can see this becoming a useful tool here as well.

Like any other tool, Internet Traffic Report is not going to solve your network problems. It should be considered just another tool in the toolbox. From their FAQ:

Q: How does this relate to me?
A: Your Internet surfing safari may be smooth today, but perhaps you can’t reach Yahoo or a few web sites in Europe. This web site will tell you if those regions of the Internet are currently slowed down. By checking the Internet Traffic Report, you can determine if your problems are global or local.

networking, internet, bandwidth, troubleshooting, network, network administration

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