SunFire T2000 Try and Buy

SunFireT2000After being tipped of on the Sun try-and-buy program by Alan Baker, a coworker and cohort, I figured I’d throw my hat into the ring for a chance to test drive a SunFire T2000… and today it arrived.

Here’s what Sun has to say about their program:

Toss your toughest workloads at the multithreaded Sun Fire T2000 server with the Solaris 10 Operating System, and watch it crank up your database and Web application performance.

We’re so confident in the quality and performance of the world’s first eco-responsible server, we’re offering a free 60-day trial, risk-free. If you’re not totally impressed, just send it back at our expense and owe us nothing.

Chances are that you will be dazzled by your trial server and come back for more. The new Sun Fire T2000 server will likely become your multithreaded workload energy-saving powerhouse of choice.

When you apply for the Try and Buy program you get the choice of a four, six, or eight core 1GHz UltraSPARC T1 processor. I chose the eight, not just because bigger is better, but also because it is closest to our production Oracle servers in capacity and price.

So once we can find the time we’ll get 64-bit Oracle installed on there and run it through the paces. On deck are some join, function, lookup intensive datamart creation scripts which currently crush our production server every evening. This should be fun.

Also of interest is Sun’s claim of this server being “the world’s first eco-responsible server”. While I am unlikely to bring in a kilowatt meter to verify these claims, we are a very green university and hey, everyone wants to save a few bucks on electric.

UPDATE: I have now had the chance to test drive some Oracle jobs on this system. Check out my findings here.

oracle, database, database administration, database administrator, dba, dbms, rdbms, sun, solaris, systems administration, system administration, sysadmin, unix, t2000, try and buy, sunfire

Tom Kyte’s Rant

Tom Kyte, one of the (many) good guys in the Oracle blogging community posted quite a rant a couple weeks ago. In short, Tom was disappointed with the attitude of a user who asked a broad, newbie question and was then upset when Tom’s answer was more involved than “Take two of these and call me in the morning.”

Tom’s experience reminds me that there is a right way and a wrong way to use the information on this site (and others.)

The wrong way to use information on this site:

“There’s the code I need!” copy, paste “That’s done!”

Using any commands you don’t understand in a production system should scare you. If it doesn’t, just consider what good excuse you’re going to give your boss when a system fails due to some code you just got off the internet.

The right way to use information on this site:

“That looks like what I want to do, let me read more on that and try it in a test system.” or “What was the syntax for what I’m doing?”

The information here isn’t provided to solve your problems, it is provided for educational purposes. Education and reference. While that may sound like it’s intended to lower my liability when you blow up your production database, it is; but it is also my true intention.

I am the type of person who wants to know how everything works. That doesn’t mean I won’t grab some code, throw it in a test database, see what happens, and learn from that example, but it does mean that I won’t put my job on the line with someone elses information.

Seek knowledge, not information. It takes longer to acquire, but it is far more applicable and will get you much further.

technology, oracle, information technology

UNIX Load Averages Explained

If you’ve spent much time working in a UNIX environment you’ve probably seen the load averages more than a few times.

load averages: 2.43, 2.96, 3.41

I have to admit that even in my sysadmin days I didn’t fully understand what these numbers were, but Zach did some digging a while ago to try to understand where these numbers are comming from.

In his blog entry from late last year, Zach sums it up quite nicely:

In short it is the average sum of the number of processes waiting in the run-queue plus the number currently executing over 1, 5, and 15 minute time periods.

The formula is a bit more complicated than that, but this serves well as a functional definition. Zach provides a bit more detail in his article and also points out Dr. Neil Gunther’s article on the topic which has as much depth on the topic as anyone could ever ask.

So what does this mean about your system?

Well, for a quick example let’s consider the output below. The load average of a system can typically be found by running top or uptime and users typically don’t need any special privileges for these commands.

load averages: 2.43, 2.96, 3.41

Here we see the one minute load average is 2.43, five minute is 2.96, and fifteen minute load average is 3.41.

Here are some conclusions we can draw from this.

  • On average, over the past one minute there have been 2.43 processes running or waiting for a resource
  • Overall the load is on a down-trend since the average number of processes running or waiting in the past minute (2.43) is lower than the average running or waiting over the past 5 minutes (2.96) and 15 minutes (3.41)
  • This system is busy, but we cannot conclude how busy solely from load averages.

It is important here to mention that the load average does not take into account the number of processes. Another critical detail is that processes could be waiting for any number of things including CPU, disk, or network.

So what we do know is that a system that has a load average significantly higher than the number of CPUs is probably pretty busy, or bogged down by some bottleneck. Conversely a system which has a load average significantly lower than the number of CPUs is probably doing just fine.

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UNIX, systems administration, sysadmin, solaris, linux, load averages, system monitoring, sun, mac, osx

Unpublished Source Code

Recently while stumbling my way through Solaris I came across a command I’m not familiar with. /usr/bin/true is a shell script which when run will return true (execute successfully.)

Now, this code clearly goes back a bit into UNIX history and I was amused to see exactly how the developers coded it. With that in mind, and against all copyrights and rights reservations I now present the complete and unabridged code for /usr/bin/true:

bash-2.03$ more /usr/bin/true
#!/usr/bin/sh
# Copyright (c) 1984, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1989 AT&T
# All Rights Reserved

# THIS IS UNPUBLISHED PROPRIETARY SOURCE CODE OF AT&T
# The copyright notice above does not evidence any
# actual or intended publication of such source code.

#ident "@(#)true.sh 1.6 93/01/11 SMI" /* SVr4.0 1.4 */

Why on earth would you copyright this? Perhaps even more impressive is the point that this is version 1.6! What did previous versions of this look like? And why such a big deal about this being unpublished source code? Hell, it’s not even source code, let alone published.

Well, if you’re curious, this script is all comments, therefore when it is run it does nothing… Of course it does nothing quite successfully, therefore returning ‘true’ for the purposes of evaluating conditions.

I do have to give the developers of this credit for simplicity. I’m sure if it weren’t for the lawyers this could have been a one line file.

unix, solaris, source code, programming, development, opensource

Changing Video Settings on SunBlade 100

To change the display resolution or refresh rate on a SunBlade 100 or similar Sun hardware isn’t as easy as it sounds. Or at least it’s not obvious. These directions are for an M64 type graphics accelerator. The steps are similar for other Sun graphics accelerators, but the command will be different (maybe ffbconfig). Check your hardware documentation for details.

These coommands should be run as root. I recommend running these commands via ssh from another system. If you accidentally change the resolution to something that is not supported you won’t be able to see so well to change it back.

To change video settings you’ll first want to find out what the card and display are capable of.

m64config -res ?

This will print the resolution and refresh rate options you have. Where three numbers are listed this represents the horizontal and vertical resolution and refresh rate respectively.

The current configuration will be shown with a [3] next to it. Write down the current resolution and refresh rate. There are a lot to choose from and you’ll want to know you can get back to one that works.

Configurations marked with a [2] are not supported by the video card and will probably not work.

To change the settings run this command with the desired resolution/refresh rate. The now forces the system to change these settings immediately rather than at next refresh.

m64config -res 1024x768x75 now

Your monitor should click and flicker and with luck will then come back at the new resolution. If it doesn’t you can change it back to the old settings by running the m64config command with the orignal settings. You did write the old setting down like I told you to right?

solaris, sun, unix, system administration, sysadmin