Innovation Creators posted an article earlier this week Start blogging…. or you’re FIRED!. Rod Boothby, the author of Innovation Creators has some similar reading on encouraging enterprise blogging by playing to your employee’s egos and Web Office technology in general but in this article he points out an excellent adoption strategy for social software in enterprise.

In her article An adoption strategy for social software in enterprise consultant Suw Charman outlines a clear strategy for fostering, rather than dictating adoption of social software (specifically blogs and wikis) in enterprise. Many of these techniques are familiar, especially in higher-ed, but this strategy puts all the aspects together.

The strategy is very bottom-up, grassroots, user, and use driven, just like the software which it is meant to be applied to; but what makes this strategy complete is it also outlines what leaders and managers should do to support the user-driven efforts.

blog,weblog, enterprise blog, project management, web20

Last week Warren left a comment on my story Converting Time Zones in Oracle asking how he could output dates with time zone like: “17-Mar-2006 14:30:00 EST”.

Well, after a bit of digging it turns out the answer is not as simple as it sounds. The traditional Oracle DATE and TIMESTAMP datatypes don’t store time zone information. A workaround might be to store time zone information in a separate column in the table, but that seems like it could cause some confusion.

Well, it looks like in version 9i Oracle has added a new datatype to handle exactly this. The TIMESTAMP WITH TIME ZONE datatype allows a time zone to be stored with a date and time either in offset from UTC or by abbreviation.

The TIMESTAMP WITH TIME ZONE datatype can be declared in the table definition anywhere you would have used DATE or TIMESTAMP. To store a date/time/time zone into a row Oracle has also added the function TO_TIMESTAMP_TZ which acts much like the familiar TO_DATE function, however will recognize TZH, TZM, TZR, and TZD for time zone hour, minute, region, and abbreviation respectively.

To retrieve time zone information you can apply the same new abbreviations to the familiar to_char function when selecting a column of type TIMESTAMP WITH TIME ZONE.

Rather than go into any more detail here, check out this article from Oracle Magazine. It covers the topic very well including example code.

sql, oracle, database administration, database, dba, database development, dbms, pl/sql

SunFireT2000After being tipped of on the Sun try-and-buy program by Alan Baker, a coworker and cohort, I figured I’d throw my hat into the ring for a chance to test drive a SunFire T2000… and today it arrived.

Here’s what Sun has to say about their program:

Toss your toughest workloads at the multithreaded Sun Fire T2000 server with the Solaris 10 Operating System, and watch it crank up your database and Web application performance.

We’re so confident in the quality and performance of the world’s first eco-responsible server, we’re offering a free 60-day trial, risk-free. If you’re not totally impressed, just send it back at our expense and owe us nothing.

Chances are that you will be dazzled by your trial server and come back for more. The new Sun Fire T2000 server will likely become your multithreaded workload energy-saving powerhouse of choice.

When you apply for the Try and Buy program you get the choice of a four, six, or eight core 1GHz UltraSPARC T1 processor. I chose the eight, not just because bigger is better, but also because it is closest to our production Oracle servers in capacity and price.

So once we can find the time we’ll get 64-bit Oracle installed on there and run it through the paces. On deck are some join, function, lookup intensive datamart creation scripts which currently crush our production server every evening. This should be fun.

Also of interest is Sun’s claim of this server being “the world’s first eco-responsible server”. While I am unlikely to bring in a kilowatt meter to verify these claims, we are a very green university and hey, everyone wants to save a few bucks on electric.

UPDATE: I have now had the chance to test drive some Oracle jobs on this system. Check out my findings here.

oracle, database, database administration, database administrator, dba, dbms, rdbms, sun, solaris, systems administration, system administration, sysadmin, unix, t2000, try and buy, sunfire

Web surfing today I stumbled upon Ora-WTF.blogspot.com. This will be one to follow.

Now most of the world won’t understand why logging users clear-text passwords in a table is a bad idea, or that your error handling should handle errors, not cause them, but for those of us who get some perverse pleasure from disaster prone, elaborate solutions to everyday problems this is a great site!

I am amused. This blog has just the right attitude for my current mood (spread too thin, working on too many disparate projects at once, and jealous of my student worker who gets to work on one thing at a time, at least at work.)

oracle, weblog, blog, wtf, database administration, database programming

Tom Kyte, one of the (many) good guys in the Oracle blogging community posted quite a rant a couple weeks ago. In short, Tom was disappointed with the attitude of a user who asked a broad, newbie question and was then upset when Tom’s answer was more involved than “Take two of these and call me in the morning.”

Tom’s experience reminds me that there is a right way and a wrong way to use the information on this site (and others.)

The wrong way to use information on this site:

“There’s the code I need!” copy, paste “That’s done!”

Using any commands you don’t understand in a production system should scare you. If it doesn’t, just consider what good excuse you’re going to give your boss when a system fails due to some code you just got off the internet.

The right way to use information on this site:

“That looks like what I want to do, let me read more on that and try it in a test system.” or “What was the syntax for what I’m doing?”

The information here isn’t provided to solve your problems, it is provided for educational purposes. Education and reference. While that may sound like it’s intended to lower my liability when you blow up your production database, it is; but it is also my true intention.

I am the type of person who wants to know how everything works. That doesn’t mean I won’t grab some code, throw it in a test database, see what happens, and learn from that example, but it does mean that I won’t put my job on the line with someone elses information.

Seek knowledge, not information. It takes longer to acquire, but it is far more applicable and will get you much further.

technology, oracle, information technology

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