Over at the ITToolbox blogs there’s a great entry on the Oracle shared pool advisory in 9iR2. This type of article is great as it presents a tool, describes it, and walks you right through applying the knowledge.

Here’s their description of the advisory:

The shared pool advisory is an Oracle9i feature that keeps track of the library cache’s use of shared pool memory. While doing this it keeps statistics to determine the behavior of differently sized shared pools. Typically, the advisory will keep a bucket of statistics for shared pool sizes that range from 50% below your current setting to 200% of your current setting. It is then up to us as database administrators to use these statistics to determine what the size of the shared pool should be through the use of the view V$SHARED_POOL_ADVICE.

Check out the article for more information on how to enable and use the advisory.

oracle, oracle database, dba, dbms, oracle dbms, database tuning, database administration

After having some DNS problems of his own, Casey over at MaisonBisson.com points out a great DNS examination tool.

DNSReport.com is nice tool for verifying your sites DNS records. It’s nothing fancy, but similar to Internet Traffic Report could be indispensable for troubleshooting website problems.

dns, internet, network, network administration, troubleshooting, networking

Need to know how much space a directory and its contents are taking up on your UNIX system? Here’s what I use:

du -ks directory

The du command is used to summarize disk usage. Without any flags will show you the usage in blocks for every directory and subdirectory specified. Since the number of blocks varies by operating system we add the -k option to specify that we want the output in kilobytes. In many operating systems you could also use -h for a “human-readable” output with abbreviations like B for bytes, K for kilobytes, M for megabytes and so on.

The -s option lets us gather only the sum of the directory specified. Without the -s flag we would get output on every subdirectory as well as the specified directory.

$ du -k stuff
408560 stuff/patch
104 stuff/scripts
408688 stuff

One other thing that is useful for finding the biggest files and directories where there are a lot to sift through is to use a wildcard to size up multiple directories, then pipe the output of du to the sort command like this:

$ du -ks ./* | sort -n
0 ./sdtvolcheck727
8 ./mpztaWqc
8 ./speckeysd.lock
304 ./dtdbcache_:0
408688 ./stuff

With sort we use the -n option to order things by arithmetic value rather than alphabetic value (making 8 come before 304) so we see the largest things at the bottom.

Try it out. As always check the man pages for more info.

Easy Linux CommandsFor more tips like this check out my book Easy Linux Commands, only $19.95 from Rampant TechPress.

unix, solaris, linux, sysadmin, system administration, storage, storage administration

Inspired by the Oracle WTF blog I have my own WTF today.

www.w3schools.com has some outstanding tutorials on HTML, CSS, SQL, PHP, and many many more. So why does such a tech savvy site require that you type www before it’s domain name to get to their server?

Go ahead, try going to http://w3schools.com. Depending on your browser the error may vary, but you sure won’t get a site.

Now for those of you who are unfamiliar with DNS and domain name resolution, trust me, it would just take one additional line in their domain resolution table to make it work both ways. Really W3Schools… WTF?

Update: W3Schools has now set up a redirect for http://w3schools.com. Not sure if this story had anything to do with it, but thanks!

wtf, programming, website, dns

Or…

Geek 2.0 meets Geek 1.0

If you’ve been following the “Web 2.0” conversations, are interested in the future of web technology, or just have a half hour or so to kill, you should check out this video of Tim O’Reilly and Bill Gates. In the video from Mix 06 O’Reilly leads off by drawing a paralell between Web 2.0 and Microsoft’s Live Software, a parallel which I’m afraid Gates didn’t (or didn’t want to) understand.

Common Web 2.0 topics came up, like perpetual beta, user added value, RSS, etc. Not surprisingly Gates was clearly uncomfortable with the topics. For example, when O’Reilly brought up the topic of perpetual beta, Gates went to his comfort zone and talked about how Microsoft’s plan to upgrade IE as often as three times per year was cutting edge. Similarly when O’Reilly mentioned the mashup of craig’s list and Google Maps as part of the evolution of the web as a platform rather than continue on that topic, Gates shapes his response into a description of the products Microsoft is developing to compete with Google Maps.

Through the whole presentation it becomes increasingly clear that Gates is only comfortable speaking about his own company’s technology while O’Reilly is talking about the direction of the industry. This is why I say Geek 2.0 meets Geek 1.0. Geek 2.0 (O’Reilly) speaks in terms like standards, technologies, trends, platforms. Geek 1.0 (Gates) speaks in terms like program x, technology b, product t. Geek 1.0 thinks their software vendor should and will innovate within their field, while geek 2.0 reaches out to open-source products and custom mashups and software which will evolve with usage.

Watch the body language in this video. O’Reilly looks like he could be sitting in his living room talking to someone. Gates looks like he’s on trial. Pretty bad since the Mix conference was hosted by Microsoft.

Check out the video here.

Thanks to Ken for pointing this out last week.

microsoft, oreilly, o’reilly, web 2.0, web20, web office, software, software development

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