Best geek jewelry ever!

HTML tag earringsThese are officially the funniest thing I’ve seen today. Etsy which is an interesting marketplace for handmade goods has earrings which clearly mark the open and close of HEAD in HTML tags.

Part of me wishes they were in lowercase, but there’s something deliciously old-school about all uppercase code.

Sadly they’re currently sold out, but I’m sure more will be available soon.

via Digg


humor, geek, funny, fun, jewelry, html

Astroglide leak

Here’s a slippery situation I’m glad I’m not in… Don Burleson points out an article on Homeland Stupidity about a security breach from the Astroglide folks.

The major personal lubricant company accidentally exposed thousands of customers personal information on the company’s website, some of whom only signed up for a free sample. To compound the problem the data was cached on Google even after it was taken down from the Astroglide website.

While it would be easy to become desensitized to all these data breaches, but they’re a good reminder to take a look at security at all levels.

information technology, identity theft

Viewing strings of text in binary files on Linux and UNIX

If a user encounters a binary file and does not know what it is used for or where it came from, they may gain some insight into its origins and use by searching for character strings within the file. If the cat command is used to view a binary file, the user will get a screen full of garbage that will more often than not change the display characteristics. Instead, the strings command should be used, as demonstrated in the following examples:

Find All Strings in the Binary File

$ strings echo
/lib/ld-linux.so.2
libc.so.6
stdout
getopt_long
__fpending
getenv
...
Copyright (C) 2002 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
This is free software; see the source for copying conditions. There is NO
warranty; not even for MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.
%s (%s) %s
Written by %s.
%s %s
memory exhausted

Again the above output has been abbreviated to save space, but you can see that there is some useful information here. Just knowing that “This is free software” and that it is copyrighted by the Free Software Foundation can give you some great insight on where this came from and why it might be there.

Finding Occurrences of a String in a Binary File

Here we show how the output of the strings command can be piped into the grep command to look for specific words within a binary file.

$ strings echo|grep GLIBC
GLIBC_2.3
GLIBC_2.1.3
GLIBC_2.1
GLIBC_2.0
GLIBC_2.2

This shows how grep can be used to limit the output of a command to only lines that contain certain text.

Easy Linux CommandsFor more tips like this check out my book Easy Linux Commands, only $19.95 from Rampant TechPress.

Buy it now!


unix, linux, text, search, find

Oracle database 9i desupported as of June 2007

In case you haven’t heard, Oracle database version 9i will be desupported as of June of 2007. That’s right, next month!

If this is the first you’ve heard of this, don’t panic. A Don Burleson points out you should be concerned if your shop is required to be on a fully supported Oracle release, but if that’s not a concern for you then you have a little leeway.

As described in this message from Oracle and metalink note 161818.1 extended support will be available through July of 2010 with the first year of extended support being at no additional cost.

If you don’t have a plan to get onto 10g (preferably 10gR2) it’s time to start getting one together.

oracle, database, database administration, dba

Two Oracle user group events in California this week

Donald Burleson points out two Oracle user group events happening in California this week. There’s the Northern California Oracle Users Group Spring Conference and the Los Angeles Oracle Users Group Spring Conference.

Unfortunately I’m on the wrong coast to take advantage of these, but if you are in or near California check it out. It’s important to take advantage of these conferences when they’re close to home!

dba, database administration, database, oracle, conference