Don Burleson points out that Oracle has sent out some Cardboard laptops!

Oracle cardboard laptop


The outside of the laptop which showed up in Andy Armstrong’s mail July 5th read “We’ve taken the idea that the outside world is a dangerous place for unprotected content.” and the inside reads “And shredded it.”

Thanks to Zach for posting the full text of the interior which reads:

“To derive maximum benefit from your business critical content, you need to share it across a wide user base. But the more people who have access to it, the greater the threat of sensitive information leaking to your competitors. That’s just for starters; content proliferation also raises the risk of regulatory non-compliance and escalating management costs. You know you can’t live without your information, but you’d be forgiven for wondering how to live with it.

Oracle’s recently acquired Information Rights Management solution can help. A key component of our Document and Records Management portfolio, it enables you to share your information when and with whom you want – without fear of the outside world.

But it doesn’t stop there. Should the worst happen – and your laptop falls into unsafe hands – we can even scamble your content before anyone works out how to access it.

We’ll be in touch shortly with more details of how to shred your content management worries.”

So what’s the story? What bandwagon is Oracle getting on here? Only time will tell. Burleson thinks it may be another step in their “unbreakable” theme. I think it may be something with Application Express as a content management system. Something to do with enterprise blogs or wiki or some other web 2.0 kind of content management.

wiki, blog, web, web20, web 2.0, oracle, dba, rdbms, dbms, marketing, laptop

There are so many facets to Oracle security that it can seem imposible to keep up with them all. This short article from Don Burleson is a nice refresher on some of the major areas of Oracle database security.

The article pays specific attention to the use of Oracle’s Virtual Private database feature and how it can be used to restrict access based on data values. With the complexity of Oracle it is nice to have these short articles on specific topics and features

Here’s a slippery situation I’m glad I’m not in… Don Burleson points out an article on Homeland Stupidity about a security breach from the Astroglide folks.

The major personal lubricant company accidentally exposed thousands of customers personal information on the company’s website, some of whom only signed up for a free sample. To compound the problem the data was cached on Google even after it was taken down from the Astroglide website.

While it would be easy to become desensitized to all these data breaches, but they’re a good reminder to take a look at security at all levels.

information technology, identity theft

In case you haven’t heard, Oracle database version 9i will be desupported as of June of 2007. That’s right, next month!

If this is the first you’ve heard of this, don’t panic. A Don Burleson points out you should be concerned if your shop is required to be on a fully supported Oracle release, but if that’s not a concern for you then you have a little leeway.

As described in this message from Oracle and metalink note 161818.1 extended support will be available through July of 2010 with the first year of extended support being at no additional cost.

If you don’t have a plan to get onto 10g (preferably 10gR2) it’s time to start getting one together.

oracle, database, database administration, dba

Donald Burleson points out two Oracle user group events happening in California this week. There’s the Northern California Oracle Users Group Spring Conference and the Los Angeles Oracle Users Group Spring Conference.

Unfortunately I’m on the wrong coast to take advantage of these, but if you are in or near California check it out. It’s important to take advantage of these conferences when they’re close to home!

dba, database administration, database, oracle, conference

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