Tired of your significant other bothering you when you’re working (or playing) at your laptop? You need one of these:

(safe for work, kids, etc.)

entertainment, fun, funny, games, computer games, commercial, video, friday

Here’s another gem from Google Video. Hey, it’s Friday, put together your own Office Sculling team. Tell your manager I told you to, or better yet, offer to let them be the one riding at the front.

friday, office, office humor, funny, fun, entertainment, video

ram.jpg

Cliff wrote a very amusing article on me about a year ago which I think some may find good for a laugh.

Office life can be dull and boring, but office artist Jon Emmons has discovered a creative outlet between meetings, business luncheons, and process mapping reports by creating sculptures out of every day objects.

Check out the full article about the products of my random fidgeting on spiralbound.net.

art, office art, office culture, funny, humor

Kill Bill Redub
OK, so this person has:

    a) too much time on their hands
    b) a warped sense of humor
    c) a perverse affinity for vintage games
    d) a warped sense of foley
    e) all of the above

Check out this video from GorillaMask.net and choose for yourself. My vote is for e) all of the above.

Thanks to Tom for passing this one on.

movies, games, video games, computer games, fighting, fight scene, tom mundell, funny, nintendo, mario brothers, mario

First-and-TenWith the Super Bowl being this weekend lots of people like me (who can’t stand not knowing how something works) will be sitting around wondering “How do they paint the first-down line on the TV?”

Since 1998, Sportvision has provided many of the major networks with the technology called “1st & Ten” to paint the first-down line on the screen.

How does the line get there?

Well, the short answer is a computer analyzes the position of the camera on the field, takes into account zoom and the angle the camera is at, and where the first down line is, and draws the line on the image.

Why doesn’t the line cover the players?

There is a carefully calibrated color pallet of all the colors on the field, and another color pallet of all the colors of players’ uniforms, skin, the ball, and anything else which the line should not be painted on.

Before the line is drawn, very pixel on screen is then compared against these two color pallets. If the pixel matches a color in the field pallet the line is drawn on that pixel, if it matches the non-field pallet the line is not drawn.

Of course all of this has to happen 30 times a second to keep up with moving cameras and players, so as you can imagine it takes some serious computer power.

For more detail, check out Sportvision’s description of the technology or How the First-Down Line Works from HowStuffWorks.com.

sports, football, technology, television, tv, super bowl, superbowl

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