Vikrant posted a comment on my previous post on getting hardware information in Solaris asking if I could explain the output of the prtdiag command in Solaris. Unfortunately the output varies quite a bit depending on what hardware you have, but here’s the output from my Ultra10.

$ /usr/platform/`uname -i`/sbin/prtdiag
System Configuration: Sun Microsystems sun4u Sun Ultra 5/10 UPA/PCI (UltraSPARC-IIi 440MHz)
System clock frequency: 110 MHz
Memory size: 1024 Megabytes

========================= CPUs =========================

Run Ecache CPU CPU
Brd CPU Module MHz MB Impl. Mask
--- --- ------- ----- ------ ------ ----
0 0 0 440 2.0 12 9.1

========================= IO Cards =========================

Bus# Freq
Brd Type MHz Slot Name Model
--- ---- ---- ---- -------------------------------- ----------------------
0 PCI-1 33 1 ebus
0 PCI-1 33 1 network-SUNW,hme
0 PCI-1 33 2 SUNW,m64B ATY,GT-C
0 PCI-1 33 3 ide-pci1095,646
0 PCI-2 33 2 pci108e,1000-pci108e,1000
0 PCI-2 33 2 SUNW,hme-pci108e,1001 SUNW,qsi-cheerio

No failures found in System
===========================

The “System Configuration” line shows vendor and model information as well as the processor version and speed. “System clock frequency” is the bus speed on the motherboard of the system. The processor speed is typically a multiple of the clock frequency.

The “Memory size” shows the total memory in the system. On most server-class systems there is additional output to show what size memory modules are in each slot in the system. This can be very useful for determining if memory can be added or if it will need to go in place of existing chips.

The “CPU” section has detailed information on each processor in the system. Again, this is far more interesting in a larger, multi-processor system. All the processors in a machine should have identical information. I don’t believe Sun systems allow mixing different processors.

The “I/O Cards” section will have information on cards added to the system but may also list I/O devices (drive controllers etc.) built into the motherboard.

So that’s the highlights. If anyone wants to send me the prtdiag output from a larger system I’ll gladly add that here with some details.

sun, solaris, system administration, sysadmin, unix