It is important for optimal performance to make sure you match up your Oracle RDBMS installation with your OS. Running a 32-bit version of Oracle on a 64-bit OS is may not give you peak performance, but also will not be able to address large segments of RAM and large files. So how do you know what your OS supports? How can you tell if that Oracle install from before you started is 64-bit? Here’s how:

Is my Operating System 64-bit?

In Solaris, from the command line (you don’t have to be root in most cases) run this command:

/usr/bin/isainfo -kv

If your OS is 64-bit, you will see output like:

64-bit sparcv9 kernel modules

If your OS is 32-bit, you will get this output:

32-bit sparc kernel modules

For Linux users

If you are running Linux, you can check your distribution with the uname command:

uname -m

The output will read x86_64 for 64-bit and i686 or similar for 32-bit.

How about this Oracle install? Is it 64-bit?

The question here is weather your Oracle binaries are 64-bit. While some of the binaries associated with Oracle may be 32-bit, the important ones will be 64 bit. To check those, follow these steps from the command line:

cd $ORACLE_HOME/bin
file oracl*

This will display the file type of your oracle binaries. If you are running 64-bit binaries, the output should look like this:

oracle: ELF 64-bit MSB executable SPARCV9 Version 1, dynamically linked, not stripped
oracleO: ELF 64-bit MSB executable SPARCV9 Version 1, dynamically linked, not stripped

If your binaries are 32-bit, the output will look like this:

oracle: ELF 32-bit MSB executable SPARC Version 1, dynamically linked, not stripped

If you find you are running 32-bit and decide to go to 64 be careful. The switch can be a bit tricky. Read the documentation closely and make sure your service contract is payed up!

oracle, dba, database administration, database, solaris, linux, sun, sun microsystems, 32-bit, 64-bit